Tuesday, December 04, 2007

Men Of Blockade-runners And Other-Naval Ships Of The Civil War

This page will be on the names of the men of the Blockade-runners and other ships.
There will be little or no historical information on the ships or battles they were in. The purpose behind this web site is to find as many surnames as possible and some times there will be a reference to a naval battle or a ship along with the information on the name. If you see a family name here and would like to know more about his ship or battle he was in I would be happy to help you all I can.

The idea behind this web site is to help family's find other family members, that's why there is little reference to any historical battles or ships on any of the pages at this web site. However this site would get real boring if it was just names after names and nothing else, so when I give a name I always try to find a name that gives a little information on what battle he or she was in or how they were captured or killed. If you find no family here but you see a reference to a battle or a ship and would like to know more about it, I would be happy to help you if I can, this goes for any information on any of my pages at this Site.

If you need help or have a question about any of the pages at this site you may write me at: dsegelquist1@cox.net

Note. You will note some of this ships and surnames will be British as England got into the Civil War too.

Note. If you would like to know more about some of these ships here are two great web site.

BUD'S "NAVY FIGHTING SHIP HISTORY" WEB SITE

http://www.angelfire.com/in/shiphistory/

INDEX OF CIVIL WAR NAVAL FORCES - UNION -CONFEDERATE SHIPS

http://www.tarleton.edu/~kjones/USNavy.html

Here is a list of blockade-runners and others-naval captures.

1. William D. Archer, captured May 12, 1863, claims to be a private in rebel service. Boasts, it is said, of having killed some of the "damned Yankees"; of his attentions to continue his exploits in this line and of having been one of those who fired upon the pursuit boat, which was enticed on shore by misuse of a flag of truce in the hands of men disguised as contraband women. Several of the pursuit men were seriously wounded at the time.

2. H. Burrows, of South Carolina, passenger in steamer Britannia, captured off the Bahamas June 24, 1863.

3. James H. Britt, of North Carolina, captured in rebel blockade-runner R. E. Lee November 9, 1863, of which he was steward. Single man, farmer, twenty-seven years old.

4. John Carnighan, captured in blockade-runner Britannia, on which he was a passenger, June 24, 1863.

5. Robert Caldwell, private, Sixty-third Georgia Regiment, captured in Wassaw Sound July 21, 1863.

6. W. H. Crawley, who claimed to be an English subject at time of capture, but is regarded as an American citizen, captured July 2, 1864, while violating the blockade.

7. J. W. Davis, captured in the steamer Lizzie Davis, running the blockade, September 16, 1863. Born in Massachusetts; forty years old; has lived in Mobile twenty years; and avowed citizen of the so-called Confederate States and particularly hostile to the Government of the United States.

8. Ross Davis, of South Carolina, was master of the blockade-runner Pet, captured off Wilmington February 15, 1864. Mariner by occupation; thirty-five years old. Made nine round trips in the Pet.

9. G. W. Davis, of North Carolina, second mate of the Britannia, captured June 24, 1863.

10. D. Drake Carter, alias Charles Drake, captured in the Thistle, trying to enter Wilmington, June 4, 1864; claimed to be a British subject, but subsequently confessed that he is a Kentuckian, and belonged to Morgan's band. Was captured, escaped from Camp Chase into Canada, and made his way to Bermuda and Nassau. Surgeon Sixth Kentucky Cavalry.

11. John Edwards, captured March 7, 1863, on Florida coast; private in rebel army. Reported as a rebel mail carrier, and captain of a guerilla band.

12. M. J. Freeman, chief engineer of the rebel steamer Alabama, captured June 19, 1864.

13. William Gance, private, Texas battalion, captured at Sabine Pass April 10, 1863.

14. R. H. Gayle, lieutenant in the rebel Navy, captured in command of the blockade-runner Stag January 9, 1865.

15. Benajmin Griffin, alias McPherson, of Maryland, captured July 6, 1864.

16. Samuel Grissam, of North Carolina, twenty-seven years old, single; was pilot on the blockade-runner R. E. Lee; captured November 9, 1863. Claimed to be a British subject, but would not swear to it. Always followed the sea.

17. W. W. Helm, of Mississippi, claims to be a captain of rebel cavalry; captured May 6, 1863, near Mobile, on a blockade-runner.

18. Joseph T. Herpin, of Alabama, was supercargo and part owner of schooner General Prim; captured April 24, 1863; was tried by military commission at Key West, and recommended to be paroled. Served for a few months in the First Alabama Volunteers; was never in action.

19. S. Henderson, captured in the blockade-runner Planter June 15, 1863, of which vessel he was steersman; fifty years old, family in the South. Declined the oath for fear of confiscation of his property; a steam-boat man by occupation; willing to take a neutral oath.

20. R. H. Hooper, born in Baltimore, captured in the steamer Hattie, off Wilmington, July 24, 1864; twenty-four years old, single man, seaman; always sailed out of Southern ports. Says his object in manning the blockade-runner was to recover his health. Discharged from rebel service on account of disability. Intended to remain abroad until close of war.

21. H. H. Ingraham, of Florida, was purser of the rebel blockade-runner R. E. Lee; captured November 9, 1863; twenty-four years old; previous business an accountant.

22. R. Jamison, was master of the blockade-running schooner Two Sisters; captured near the Rio Grande September 20, 1863.

23. C. P. Jervey, was first mate of the rebel blockade-runner Ella and Anna; always followed the sea; captured November 6, 1863.

24. John Lewis, second mate of the blockade-runner Matagorda, captured September 10, 1864.

25. Issac Lewis, was steward of the blockade-running steamer Lucy; captured November 2, 1864; claimed to be a British subject, but was ascertained to be an American citizen.

26. Alexander Lawrance, was chief engineer of the Ella and Anna, blockade-running steamer; citizen of Baltimore; single; captured November 6, 1863.

27. Malcom Macneu, passenger in the blockade-running steamer Sapulding captured October 4, 1863; native of Pennsylvania.

28. William R. Postell, was master of the blockade-runner Ida; captured July 8, 1864; native of South Carolina; residence Georgia; formerly in the U. S. Navy.

29. C. W. Westondorff, of Charleston, S. C., commanded the Bermuda, which was captured in the early part of the war, loaded with arms, &c., intended, as was supposed, for the insurgents. Taken to Philadelphia, released, and remained there for a year or two. Went back to the South to see his family, as he states, and was captured in the steamer Lillian August 24, 1864, on which he was a passenger.

30. George McD. Stoll, passenger in the steamer Spaulding, captured October 11, 1863; citizen of North Carolina.

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,
Morris Island, S. C., September 7, 1864, Charles Harris.

I was born in Ireland; am twenty-five years of age; have been in this country fourteen years. I resided nine years in New York. I was on board a steam-boat on the Mississippi till all the boats stopped running, and then I came to Charleston and tried to run the blockade on the steamer Macaroni, but could not get out and they compelled me to enlist in the Navy about two years ago. I was never paid, but got a little money now and then. They think that if Lincoln is re-elected there will be a revolution in the West; if McClellan is elected they think he will recognize the Confederacy and there will be peace; that is their only hope. There is gun-boat up near Columbus, Ga., which they are trying to fit out. I think they are determined to do something desperate if these boats get out. I do not know anything of Fort Sumter. I heard that some 600 or 700 prisoners were confined in Charleston. I jumped off the boat last night and swam to Morris Island. They heard me and sent a boat after me, but I eluded them.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, FORTH PULASKI AND TYBEE ISLAND, GA.,
Fort Pulaski, Ga., march 5, 1864.

A schooner ( name unknown ) ran aground on the east side of Tybee Island on March 3, 1864, she was 35 tons. The cargo was alcohol and coffee her crew was, Captin John Wicks, Supercargo C. W. Hawes, Mate Henry Caserdy and seamen John Thomas and William Sands.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT MARY'S DISTRICT,
Point Lookout, Md., April 15, 1864.

About April 12 or 15, 1864, A Mr. Joseph H. Maddox, who claimed to be the owener of some tobacco, and to be an emissary of the Federal Government, was taken as a prisoner and brought to this point. Maddox has been arrested once before as a blockade-runner, and says he paid Roverdy Johnson $1,000 to get him clear, which statement is confirmed by a declaration previously made by his brother, who resides in this county.

Sloops.

1. William Jones was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincennes while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and was conveyed to New York.

2. Michael O'Brien was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincennes while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and was conveyed to New York.

3. William Sanger was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincennes while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and was conveyed to New York.

4. George Watt was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincennes while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and was conveyed to New York.

5. Arthur Wardle was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vinceness while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and conveyed to New York.

6. William Cuthbert was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincennes while running the blockade at the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi and conveyed to New York.

7. James Hopkinson was one of the crew of the English bark Empress captured by the U. S. sloop Vincenness while running the blockade at the Northeast Murray of New York.

8. Thomas R. Stewart was arrested in Chesapeake Bay near Dorchester County, Md., about the 29th of August, 1861, on board the sloop T. J. Evans which was seized by the U. S. schooner Dana. He was charged with being one of the crew of the sloop which was conveying contraband arms and goods to the rebels in Virginia. Stewart was taken to Washington and placed in jail. An investigation of his case resulted in his being released by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States September 27, 1861.

9. Midshipman Albert G. Hudgins, of the Navy of the Confederate States, and one of the officers of the sloop of war Sumter, was recently captured at sea while acting as prize master and conveyed to New York, and reliable information has been laid before me that he is being treated by the authorities of the United States not as a prisoner of war but as a criminal, and that since the 21st of July last he has been held in solitary confinement in a cell in the Tombs.

10. John Hipkins, Jr., alias Edward R. Platt, was arrested by order of the Secretary of the Navy and conveyed to Fort Lafayette January 28, 1862. This person shipped in the U. S. service on the Sloop - of - war Vincennes but afterward refused to fight for the Government, alleging that his paarents lived in Virginia and he could not fight against the rebels of that State. the said John Hipkins remained in custody in Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with an order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

11. John and Josept Shaney, it appears that they were picked up in an open boat by the guard boat of the U. S. sloop of war Cumberland, of the blockading squadron, about November 12, 1861, and sent to Fort Warren. An order was issued from the Department of State dated December 9, 1861, directing Colonel Dimick to release John and Joseph Shaney do no act hostile to the United States. They were accordingly released December 12, 1861.

Schooners.

Crew of the Royal Yacht.

1. Thomas Chubb was arrested on board the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was captured by the U. S. frigate Santee in Galvestion Bay, he being one of the crew of that schooner. Having been sent to New York Chubb with his companions who were captured at the same time was by order of the Secretary of State dated December 23, 1861, committed to Fort Lafayette. Lieutenant Colonel Martin Burke reported by letter February 4, 1862, to the Secretary of State that "Chubb of the Royal Yacht has been released on his parole of honor by order of the honorable Secretary of the Navy. "

2. H. N. Duble woard the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was captured by the U. S. frigate Santee in Galveston Bay November 8, 1861. Having been sent to New York Duble with the crew of the Royal Yacht was committed by order of the Secretary of State dated December 23, 1861, to Fort Lafayette. Duble was charged with disloyalty to the United States Government and with being in active sympathy with the rebels. The said H. N. Duble remained in Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

3. Ira G. Rogers was arrested on board the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was captured by the U. S. frigate Santee, he being one of the crewof that schooner. Having been sent to New York Roogers with the balance of the crew captured at the same time was by order of the Secretary of State dated December 23, 1861, committed to Fort Lafayette. An order was issued from the Department of State dated February 1, 1862, directing Colonel Burke commanding at Fort Lafayette, to release Rogers on his taking the oath of allegiance. He was accordingly released February 6, 1862.

4. Ambrose Snow was arrested on board the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was caputred by the U. S. frigate Santee in Galveston Bay, he being one of the crew of that schooner. Having been sent to New York Snow with his companies who were captured at the same time was by order of the Secretary of State dated December 23, 1861, committed to Fort Lafayette. The said Ambrose Snow remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

5. Joseph F. Frisbee was arrested on board the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was captured in Galveston Bay by the U. S. frigate Santee, he being one of the crew of that schooner. Having been sent to New york Frisbee was by order of the Secretary of STate dated December 23, 1861, committed to Fort Lafayette. He remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when he was transferred to the charge of the War Department.

6. John E. Davidson was captured on board the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht, which was captured by the U. S. frigate Santee in Galveston Bay November 8, 1861. Having been sent to New York Davidson together with the balance of the crew was committed to Fort Lafayette December 23, 1861.

Men of the schooner Venus.

1. Jacob Johnson was arrested on the prize schooner Venus which vessel was captured in the Gulf of Mexico. The time of the capture of the vessel for when Johnson was committed to Fort Lafayette has not been received by the Department of State. The said Jacob Johnson remained in custody Februaary 15, 1862, in Fort Lafayette.

2. Andrew Nelson was captured on the prize schooner Venus in the Gulf of Mexico and with others of the crew of that vessel was brought to New York and confined in Fort Lafayette. The date of the capture or the time when Nelson and his companions of the Venus were committed to Fort Lafayette has not been communicated to the Department of State. The said Andrew Nelson remained in custody in Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862.

3. Peter Hanson was one of the crew of the prize schooner Venus captured in the Gulf of Mexico and was brought to New York and confined in Fort Lafayette. The date of the capture or when Hanson and the crew of the Venus were committed to Fort Lafayette has not been communicated to the Department of State. The said Peter Hanson remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862.

4. Charles Smith was taken on the prize schooner Venus in the Gulf of Mexico and with the vessel conveyed to New York. No information in regard to the date of the capture of the vessel or when he was committed to Fort Lafayette has been received at the Department of State. He remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862.

5. Jacob Johnson was arrested on the prize schooner Venus which vessel was captured in the Gulf of Mexico. The time of the capture of the vessel for when Johnson was committed to Fort Lafayette has not been received by the Department of State. The said Jacob Johnson remained in custody Februaary 15, 1862, in Fort Lafayette.

6. Charles Eastwood was taken on the prize schooner Venus in the Gulf of Mexico and with the vessel conveyed to New York. No info to the date of the capture of the vessel or when Eastwood was committed to Fort Lafayette has been received at the Department of State. The said Charles Eastwood remained in custody February 15, 1862, at Fort Lafayette.

7. Edward Zickler was captured on the prize schooner Venus in the Gulf of Mexico and having been taken to New York was places in Fort Lafayette. The date of the capture of the vessel or when Zickler was committed to Fort Lafayette has not been received at the Department of State. The said Edward Zickler remained in custody at Fort Lafayette Febraury 15, 1862.
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The privateer schooner Savannah, of Charleston, S. C., Captain T. H. Baker, commissioned by Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, was captured about 60 miles east of Charleston, S. C.
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MOYAMENSING PRISON, Philadelphia, October 31, 1861.

Walter W. Smith, prize master schooner Enchantress, of brig Jeff. Davis; Daniel Mullings, of Enchantress and of the Jeff. Davis; E. Rochford, schooner Enchantress and brig Jeff. Davis; Thomas Quigley, one of the prize crew of the schooner Enchantress; William Perry, captain of Petrel; Rich. M. Harvey, first lieutenant of Petrel; Colin Campbell, second lieutenant of schooner Petrel; Thomas Woods, seaman of Petrel; John G. S. Tucket, seaman of Petrel; John Mack seaman of Petrel; J. N. Morgan, steward of Petrel; Henry Mills, seaman of Petrel; George Hawkins, seaman of Petrel; Edward Murphy, seaman of Petrel; Hugh Monaghan, landsman of Petrel; Robert (his x mark) Barnet, mate of Petrel; Richard R. Jeffers, seaman of Petrel; John Cronin, seaman of Petrel; Geo. H. Roberts, seaman of Petrel; Michael Dooling, landsman of Petrel; C. H. Marriott, ordinary seaman of Petrel; John C. (his x mark) Cunningham, seaman of Petrel; Frank A] boy of Petrel; Wm. (his x mark) Brain, cook of Petrel; H. Oltmans, cook of Petrel; John M. Dearing, seaman of Petrel; George Sawden, seaman of Petrel; Wm. H. (his x mark) Hazlehurst, seaman of Petrel; Daniel (his x mark) Courney, second cook of Petrel; Henry A. Rowan, seaman of Petrel; Edward Flynn, seaman of Petrel; A. C. Delahay, seaman of Petrel; John H. Edwards, seaman of Petrel; George S. Harrison, seaman of Petrel; A. C. Williams, seaman of Petrel.
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Steamers.

James R. riley, captain of the steamer Sumter, sunk during the night of August 30, 1863, by the firing of Fort Moultrie

Note. There is more information on the above if you would like it Just ask.

Captain J. C. Carter, was the comanding officer of the steamer Michigan.

Steamer Massachusetts.

Steamer Massachusetts arrived at Fortress Friday night with Lieutenants G. W. Brown and N. J. Camp, Twenty-third Missouri; J. S. Agey and G. H. Logan, Fourteenth Iowa; H. W. Mays, Ninth Kentucky, and Sergeants I. N. Rhodes and Milton Rhodes, Fourteenth Iowa, escaped prisoners, on board. All were captured at Shiloh except Mays, who was taken by the guerrilla Morgan. They belonged to General Prentiss' brigade and they corroborated the statement that the surrender took place in the evening after stubborn struggle. While at Macon, Ga., June 1, Lieutenant Camp, Brown and Mays determined to escape. They passed sentinels and walked through town singing Dixie. Traversing swamp at midnight reached Ocmulgee River and finding small boat, by using tin plate and canteen for paddle, started. Next morning found them twenty-five miles from Macon. Secreted themselves all day and at night having cut wooden paddles from tree started. Toward morning came across a boat which they endeavored to avoid by hiding in bushes. To their horror, however, boat came alongside, but-sub-sequent joy-turned out to be Lieutenant Agey and Logan and two Sergeants Rhodes, who escaped a previous Tuesday in disguise of rebel soldiers and having around awaits a bag with flour, dried peaches, &c., and files, salt in boots, and they subsequently escaped in boat. The two boats then kept together safely 600 miles by night with oars muffled with cypress moss. On the 11th reached Hawkinsville, where three small deserted steamers were tied up. Passed by without observation. On trip where persons [were] observed on bank, cheered for Davis and said were messengers from Davis. On the 17th reached Wolf Island, in Atlamaha Sound. Next day reached Sapelo Island; found deserted. On the 18th went aboard steamer Wamsutta which next day transferred to steamer Florida at Saint Simon's Sound. Put aboard steamer Massachusetts, which brought [us] to Fort Monroe. They report Lieutenant Bliss, of Fifty-eighth Illinois [Second Michigan Battery], on May 1, was wantonly murdered by the rebel guard.

Steamer Nashville.

1. First Lieutenant Commander Charles C. Simms, C. S. steamer Nashville.
2. Lieutenant John W. Bennett, C. S. Navy, commanding steamer Nashville.

Steamer Constitution.

1. The provost- marshal- general of the department will turn over to Captain C. D. Mehjaffey, First U. S. Infantry, the following prisoners now in his custody: A. B. Moore, late self- styled Governor of Alabama; George W. Gayle, author of a certain inflammatory article in the Selma Dispatch of December 1, 1864; John Cantler and Watson Graves, witnesses in the case of Gayle. Captain Mehaffey will be furnished with a guard of one non- commissioned officer and ten men of the First U. S. Infantry, and will proceed with this guard and the above- named prisoners by the steamer Constitution.

Steamer Planter.

1. steamers Planter and Starlight, having on board five companies Forty-eighth New York State Volunteers, under command of Captain D. W. Strickland, and a detachment of Company G, Third Rhode Island Artillery, in charge of Captain John H. Gould. We arrived at the mouth of May-commonly called Bluffton-River, about three-quarters of an hour before daybreak, and proceeded as rapidly as possible up the river.

Steamer Luminary.

1. The One hundred and seventeenth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Captain W. P. Olden commanding, will disembark his command from the Des Moines and embark on steamer Luminary, and proceed from this port to New Orleans, La.

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Fort Macon.

The commanding officer, Captain Samuel Lockwood, discovered our movements he brought all his vessels into action, and for a time attracted the enemy's attention to such an extent as to greatly facilitate the officers in charge of the mortar batteries in correcting their range and length of fuse, but owing to the extreme roughness of the sea the fleet was compelled to withdraw. At 4.30 in the afternoon a white flag was displayed upon the ramparts of the fort and the firing ceased upon both sides. After communicating with the general commanding during the night of the 25th, on the morning of the 26th, at 9.30 o'clock, I received the surrender of the fort and garrison.

6 comments:

ellenjay99 said...

I am trying to locate information about the Ship, "Edina" a British ship built by Barclay Curle in 1854.I am tryin to verify if she was a blockade runner to Galveston during the Civil War. Can you assist.

Dennis Segelquist said...

The Edina was purchased and used as a blockade runner during the American Civil War carrying cotton from the Confederate states in 1861.

RPayne said...

Trying to find info on blockcade runner the schooner " Mechanic " Owned by Daniel J Payne aka Captain Harris of St Mary county Maryland.
Thanks

Dennis Segelquist said...

I was unable to find any info on your schoore or names in my index's

NccPastor said...

Great work Dennis!! I am a quasi expert on the Confederacy's Western Campaign, operations and journey into NM, Arizona and finally General Shelby's entry into Mexico. My GGGrandfather was a Naval Captain I was told on Blockade runners.. I found an entry on him (John Carnighan) here. "John Carnighan, captured in blockade-runner Britannia, on which he was a passenger, June 24, 1863." Would you happen to know the location of the Britannia at the time of capture? Thanks Dennis!! Ronald Carnighan

Dennis Segelquist said...

The Britannia was captured by the U. S. S. Santiago De Cuba, June 25, 1863, at Palmetto Point, Eleuthera Island. She was on her way to Nassan, New Providence, after her capture she was sent to Boston Mass.