Wednesday, April 09, 2008

The Names of Harper's Ferry.

It is not my intent to give a full history of Harper’s Ferry, as this site is all about surnames. But for those of you who have not visited this site before, I always give a little back ground history so you can get a feel on what was going on in and around your family’s at this time in history. The names on this list will have no family information, it is to confirm your family’s whereabouts and give you a time frame. If you have any information on any of these names and would like to help others that may visit this page by adding some information, or to ask a question you may do so at the following address. dsegelquist1@cox.net

Note. The information for this page comes from the Military affairs volumes 2, 3, 4 and 5. Other information will come from Bills and other reports, which are all housed at the Library of Congress.

The armory was originally built in 1799 on 125 acres, in Jefferson county, Virginia, and was purchased by the United States in 1796, the ferry itself was initially established in 1761 across the Potomac River. When the United States purchased Harper’s land after his death in 1782, and put up the armory it was soon found that there would be a need for housing for the workers and their family’s and the need for other conveniences. However there would be four acres the United States could not build on as the acres were put aside in Robert Harper will.

Extract from the last will and testament of Robert B. Harper, deceased, executed on October 1, 1782.

“ It is further my last will, that four acres of land, most convenient around my graveyard, shall be laid off by my executers, and be entirely appropriated to the use of a graveyard, and all my debts, due by bond, note, and book account, and all the rents now due from my ferry, be by my executor disposed of in the best manner towards erecting a graveyard and building a church on said four acres of land, and having a head and foot stone for my wife’s grave, and likewise for my own.”
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By 1821, Harper’s Ferry , was on 1,890 acres including a ferry that crossed the Shenandoah. There are 89, dwelling houses of different sizes many would be two stories, only 5., would have cellars. There would be one Superintendent’s office, nine work shops, two arsenals, one grinding mill, one furnace and forges, two school houses, no church’s, one draw-grinding shop, one proof house, one timber shed, one tempering shop, one engine house with lodging room, one saw mill, one magazine, one Iron store house, one charcoal house, one stone-coal house and one stable.

The buildings and work shops at the armory were of different sizes the biggest being a two story work shop, 131 by 45 feet, and made of brick. The smallest was the proof house which was 14 by 12 feet, and made also of brick. The were many dwelling house some would house small shops, the biggest would be a two story and was 94 by 21 feet, and made of wood. The smallest would be 16 by 14 feet and made of wood. Although there is a lot of information on the buildings at Harper’s Ferry there is nothing on any surnames.

In February of 1829, the House of Representatives asked for a report from the ordnance department on the number of buildings which have been erected by private individuals on the government lands at Harper’s Ferry. They wanted to know when they were built and by whom, and what authority they have been purchased and how many are yet in possession, and subject to the claims of the buildings and what is the amount demanded for each. What is the amount of rent annually received sine January 1823, for each of the buildings, also for any other owned by the government at Harper’s Ferry.

In the report it was noted that there was three or four buildings erected on the hill between the two rivers that was not in the report because they were built on four acres put aside by Robert B. Harper’s Will. They were Mrs. Beston a female school establishment, three small huts that belong to free blacks who are; William Prim, Adams Jones and Jack Wood, who’s duties are sextons and grave-diggers. There are two churches which are also built on the four acre lot.

Buildings erected by private individuals.

1. William Reed, a cellar valued at $152.
2. Jacob Haines, a cellar valued at $153.
3. Nathan Turk, a stone dwelling valued at $79.
4. Thomas Welders, a stone dwelling valued at $124.
5. George Little a wooden dwelling built in 1826, valued at $186.57.
6. C. C. Cameron, a wooden dwelling valued at $160.
7. Jacob Ott, a wooden dwelling built in 1825, valued at $50.
8. S. McDowell, a cellar to a dwelling valued at $65.
9. M. Britenbaugh, a cellar to a dwelling valued at $118.84.
10. James Thrapp, a wooden building valued at $52.
11. J. A. Shafter, a wooden building built in 1810, valued at $170.60.
12. Jacob Beard, a wooden building built in 1824, valued at $94.
13. William Cannon, a wooden building valued at $93.
14. John Marlatt, a wooden building valued at $71.82.
15. Abso. Vanvacter, a wooden building built in 1812, valued at $209.81.
16. Mrs McBee, a wooden building built in 1824, valued at $47.
17. Joseph Davis, a wooden building built in 1824, valued at $116.33.
18. W. T. A. Pollock, a wooden building built in 1825, valued at $352.72.
19. D. Crawford, a stone dwelling built in 1824, valued at $288.o7.
20. Charles Staley, a wooden dwelling built in 1824, valued at $101.
21. Joshua Cox, a wooden dwelling valued at $100.
22. R Cruzen, a wooden dwelling built in 1825, valued at $299.98.
23. John Duke, a wooden dwelling built in 1825, valued at $348.46.
24. Hugh McCoy, a wooden dwelling valued at $101.41.
25. Mathias Spangle, a wooden dwelling built 1825, valued at $162.
26. John Griffths, a wooden dwelling built in 1819, valued at $168.37.
27. David Adams, a wooden dwelling valued at $89.
28. Ashel Davis, wooden dwelling valued at $238.45.
29. T. McNulty, a wooden dwelling built 1825, valued at $222.
30. R. A. Waters, a wooden dwelling built 1825, valued at $154.
31. Eman Engles, a wooden dwelling built 1825, valued at $88.03.
32. John C. Renseld, a stone dwelling valued at $600.
33. William McCoy, brick dwelling built 1824, valued at $549.48.
34. John Crutchly, a wooden dwelling built 1825, valued at $150.
35. Jona. Anderson, a wooden dwelling valued at $220.84.
36. Charles Button, a wooden dwelling built 1820, valued at $150.
37. William Smallwood, a stone dwelling built 1825, claimed value $203.24., was purchased by the government in 1826, for $400.
38. Susan Downey, a wooden dwelling valued at $96.
39. M. Zimmerman, a wooden dwelling built 1812, valued at $350.
40. John Bulter, a wooden dwelling built 1820, valued at $150.
41. John Johnson, a wooden dwelling claimed value $75.
42. James Merrick, a wooden dwelling claimed value $75.
43. Jons. Irving, a stone dwelling built 1826, claimed value $350.
44. John A. Smith,a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1822, for $100.
45. Joshua Cox, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1822, for $65.
46. Soel Norman, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1823, for $24.07.
47. George Rowles, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1822, for $22.
48. William Adams, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1823, for $100.
49. Phil. Funk, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1823, for $122.66.
50. Charles Staley, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1823, for $16.17
51. R. Breeden’s Adm’r, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for$50.
52. Amasa Mars, a stone building purchased by the government in 1823, for $12.11
53. William Green, a brick building purchased by the government in 1823, for $119.89.
54. Joseph Barnes, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $33.93.
55. Reuben Stipes, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $24.36.
56. Jacob Ott, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $37.26.
57. Elisha Larkin, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $91.75.
58. George Zorger, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $35.20.
59. Carey Thompson, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $37.07.
60. Martin Hartman, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $78.87.
61. Richard King, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $163.08.
62. Frederick Riley, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $25.38.
63. Henry Stipes, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $215.85.
64. Charles H. Mills, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $43.03.
65. David Adams, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $109.50.
66. Levi Hall, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $46.67.
67. Thomas Stedman, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $56.58.
68. Samuel J. Lindsay, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $84.42.
69. Thomas Stipes, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $214.14.
70. Mary Seliz, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $806.73.
71. John Baylis, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $22.07.
72. Isaac Wood, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $109.75.
73. Joshua Riley, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $225.75.
74. John Coates, a stone building purchased by the government in 1823, for $161.39
75. William Grisfield, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for 34.04
76. Abram Berlin, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $57.84.
77. William Adams, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $39.66.
78. Jacob Coons, a stone building purchased by the government in 1823, for $209.04.
79. Andrew Board, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $37.
80. David Johnson, a brick building purchased by the government in 1823 for $158.87.
81. John Holt, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $58.53.
82. Ezckiel Stipes, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $66.54.
83. John Riley, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $27.53.
84. Philip Hoffman, a brick building purchased by the government in 1823, for $339.37.
85. Meshac Kirby, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1823, for $286.66.
86. Michael Melhorn, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $229.11.
87. Nathan Benton, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $39.40.
88. Asahel Davis, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $74.
89. Charles Witersmith, brick building purchased by the government in 1824, for $114.97.
90. William Smallwood, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $80.
91. Stetson Bisbee, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $91.43.
92. Charles Fouke, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $114.06.
93. Edm. Burke, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $32.45.
94. John Rockenbaugh, a stone building purchased by the government in 1824, for $560.42.
95. Nathaniel French, a stone building purchased by the government in 1824, for $38.10.
96. Roger Jones, a stone building purchased by the government in 1824, for $13.03.
97. James Pryor, brick building purchased by the government in 1824, for $127. 17.
98. William McCoy, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $89.37.
99. Thomas Stedman, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1824, for $92.90.
100. Nahum Patch, a stone building purchased by the government in 1825, for $25.53.
101. Tim. Herrington, a stone building purchased by the government in 1825, for $301.18.
102. John Donaldson, a stone building purchased by the government in 1825, for $19.
103. Francis O’Neale, a brick building purchased by the government in 1825, for $171.59.
104. John Wegginton, a wooden building purchased by the government in 1826, for $19.
105. John McFarland, a stone building purchased by the government in 1826, for $171.59.
106. Francis O’Neale, a brick building purchased by the government in 1825, for $423.
107. John Tully, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1827, for $12.
108. John Roderick, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1827, for $25.
109. William McClnre, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1827, for $7.23.
110. William Phelan, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1827, for $25.
111. Elizabeth Keep, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1827, for $200.
112. Nathan Yeamans, a wooden dwelling purchased by the government in 1828, for $296.03.
113. George Harding, a stone dwelling intended as a ferry house built in 1826, purchased by the government valued at $650.

Note. These were later added to the list.

1. In 1812, the Potomac Co., built a stone storehouse and dwelling, a brick dwelling, a boarding house and a wooden warehouse all valued at $5000.

2. In 1816, Colonel Jamieson built a wooden storehouse and dwelling valued at $800.
116. In 1826, Philip and David Coons built a stone, rough-cast used as a dwelling, boarding house and a butchery valued at $2,500.

3. In 1826, John S. Gallagher built a frame house plastered outside, was built for a dwelling house and printing office, valued at $600.

4. In 1826, Michael Garry built a frame storehouse and rough-cast dwelling house valued at $2,500.

5. In 1826, Michael W. Wartman built a small temporary storehouse valued at $175.

This is part of a report on the condition and occupancy of the land belonging to The United States at Harper’s Ferry, March 2, 1829.

In regard to the authority for purchasing buildings, improvements, &c., I have to observe that it has always been considered the duty of the superintendent to provide suitable accommodations for the workmen employed in the armory. This could only be done by building new buildings, or purchasing’ improvements already made. The latter of these alternatives was, in many instances, the more expedient, from death, removal, change of circumstances of the persons who made the improvements, or other similar causes. It frequently occurs, when good workmen, having married, or from other causes need dwellings, or additions to those previously occupied, that the armory funds will not, at the time, admit of expenditures being made for such purposes. They are, therefore, permitted, when able-to do so, to make the improvements at their own charge, with the understanding that afterwards, when convenient to the armory, they shall be paid for the same, according to fair valuation. The passing of such accounts from time to time, for many years past, by the accounting officers, has also been considered as approving the course pursued in this respect.

It will be seen that no rents have been yet collected upon the lots built on. and occupied by private individuals not connected with the armory. This has resulted from the following state of things, viz: In some of the cases the leases have not yet been executed, and in none have the amounts of ground rent to be charged been ascertained. Diversity of opinion has occurred on this subject; and, on account of .the uncertainty of the superintendent’s power in such cases, it has not been considered advisable to agitate the question in what manner and how far the superintendent can coerce the settlement of claims to the United States on account of this armory, until the question was settled by advice of counsel, or otherwise, as the case might require; for, had the attempt been made, and failed, a vast deal of trouble and difficulty would have been encountered, which, in consequence of the course pursued, has been avoided.

In accordance with your letter of the 23d of last July, requiring me to obtain legal advice on this and other subjects, the questions of difficulty were immediately submitted to Moses T. Hunter, esq.. the counsel usually employed in behalf of this armory, whose opinion was enclosed to you on the 14th of November last. By reference to that opinion, it will be seen that the subject is attended with very considerable difficulty, and the most advisable course to be pursued jot yet clearly ascertained; when, however, such course is determined upon, there will be no difficulty on collecting the rents in arrears, as the parties from whom they are due are entirely solvent. It may be well to remark that each of the grants or permissions given to the individuals mentioned under the head of persons not connected with the armory to build on the public lands are decidedly advantageous to the interests of the armory, and required for the Convenience and accommodation of the workmen therein employed, so much so that it is believed the United States have derived from them benefits equivalent to several thousand dollars, by thus destroying, in some measure, the imposition and oppressive monopoly which before prevailed, and which grew out of the fact that all of the real property at this place, except that of the United States, belonged to a single family, who exacted exorbitant rents from shopkeepers, mechanics, &cc., even sometimes restricting them to particular kinds of business, who were thus, in their turn, compelled to charge the workmen employed in the armory corresponding rates for the ordinary means of subsistence, and thereby, in the end, rendering it necessary for the government to pay for work at prices higher than those for which it might otherwise have been done.

On a former occasion Mr. Calhoun, during the period that he was at the head of the War Department, and to whom this subject was referred, was clearly of opinion that the original purchase of the lands occupied by this armory, from John Wager, left it entirely discretionary with the government whether or not to permit merchants, shopkeepers, mechanics, and tradesmen of every description whatsoever, to erect buildings and pursue their different modes of business, on the public lands here, to any extent that the interests of the armory and the convenience of workmen therein employed might require.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,

Col. GEG. BOMFORD. JAMES STUBBLEFIELD.

Note. The following list will give the names of the workers and the rent they paid. This list covers the years of 1823-1828, By watching the pay of the rent you will be able to tell when these workers came and went.

Rent collected on the dwelling houses owned by the government and rented by the workers of the United States armory at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia.

1. Philip Hoffman, 1823-$6., 1824-$24., 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$24., 1828-$24.
2. George Mallory, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$4., 1826-$4., 1827-$16., 1828-$16.
3. Edward Wager, 1823-$12., 4. Charles C. Cameron, 1823-$5., 1824-$7.50, 1825-$3.
5. Charles H. Mills, 1823-$5., 1824-$11., 1825-$9.
6. William D. Moore, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1825-$9.
7. John Shubridge, 1823-$3., 1824-$6., 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
8. Hezekiah Butt, 1823-$3., 1824-$4.50, 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
9. John Rodorock, 1823-$4., 1824-$4. 1825-$2., 1826-$10.50, 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
10. James Green, 1823-$6., 1824-$9., 1825-$9.
11. John Robinbaugh, 1823-$10., 1824-$20., 1825-$20., 1826-$20., 1827-$20., 1828-$20.
12. John Marlatt, 1823-$7.50, 1824-$15., 1825-$11.25, 1826-$15.75, 1827-$16., 1828-$12.
13. Michael Crowl, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$14., 1828-$16.
14. Ezckiel Stipes, 1823-$3.. 1824-$8., 1825-$8., 1826-$8., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
15. Oswin Sturdy, 1823-$3., --------- --------- --------- 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
16. John Donaldson, 1823-$8., 1824-$8., 1825-$24., 1826-$5.
17. Isaac Wood, 1823-$8., 1824-$20., 1825-$20.--------1827-$18.75, 1828-$22.50.
18. Timothy Herrington, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$19., 1827-$15., 1828-$20.
19. Jacob Ott, 1823-$6., 1824-$14., 1825-$14., 1826-$14., 1827-$14., 1828-$14.
20. John Wiggington, 1823-$3., 1824-$6., 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$12.50, 1828-$4.
21. Jacob Haines, 1823-$8., 1824-$12., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$13., 1828-$4.
22. Levi Hall, 1823-$4., 1824-$5.50, 1825-$3., 1826-$3., 1827-$6.
23. Evan Lindsay, 1823-$8.
24. Hiram Kerney, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$12.
25. William Ferrells, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$6.
26. Absolom Vanvacter, 1823-$6., 1824-$15., 1825-$12., 1826-$9., 1827-$9., 1828-$3.
27. Samuel Thropp, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$12., 1826-$20., 1827-$12., 1828-$8.
28. William Green, 1823-$8., 1824-$20., 1825-$5.
29. William Mallory, 1823-$8., 1824-$6., 1825-$2., 1826-$15., 1827-$6., 1828-$9.
30. John Coons, 1823-$6., 1824-$12.
31. Joseph Barnes, 1823-$4., ------------ 1825-$14., 1826-$20., 1827-$18., 1828-$16.
32. William Simpson, 1823-$4., 1824-$6., 1825-$2.
33. William Nunamaker, 1823-$3., 1824-$1.50, -------1826-$20., 1827-$18., 1828-$16.
34. Peter Hoffman, 1823-$4.50, 1824-$12., 1825-$3., 1826-$6., 1827-$9., 1828-$18.
35. Henry Stipes, 1823-$3., 1824-$12., 1825-$4.
36. Reuben Stipes, 1823-$3., 1824-$2., 1825-$6., 1826-$10., 1827-$4.
37. Daniel Little, 1823-$5.
38. Alexander Wintzell, 1823-$6.
39. John Holt, 1823-$4., 1824-$10., 1825-$10., 1826-$10., 1827-$7.50, 1828-$12.50.
40. John Claspey, 1823-$5., 1824-$7.50, 1825-$10., 1826-$7.50
41. William McClure, 1823-$8., 1824-$6., 1825-$4., 1826-$6., 1827-$4., 1828-$8.
42. William Smallwood, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$6., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
43. Charles Wintersmith, 1823-$8., 1824-$18., 1825-$15., 1826-$20., 1827-$20., 1828-$20.
44. George Zoger, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$15., 1826-$20., 1827-$8.
45. John Baylis, 1823-$4., 1824-$2., 1825-$11., 1826-$2.
46. Thomas Hall, 1823-$4.
47. William Mockbee, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$9., 1827-$10., 1828-$8.
48. Daniel Hinkles, 1823-$10., 1824-$20., 1825-$20., 1826-$10.
49. Frederick Reily, 1823-$6., 1824-$15., 1825-$12., 1826-$9., 1827-$10., 1828-$8.
50. William Chambers, 1823-$3., 1824-$6., 1825-$8.----------- 1827-$9., 1828-$9.
51. Nathan Benton, 1823-$4., 1824-$8., 1825-$8., 1826-$8., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
52. Joshua Cox, 1823-$4., 1824-$8., 1825-$8., 1826-$8., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
53. Thomas Dakin, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
54. John Sickofuse, 1823-$5., 1824-$2.50.
55. William Adams, 1823-$5., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$9.
56. Richard King, 1823-$4., 1824-$18., 1825-$13.50, 1826-$18., 1827-$13.50, 1828-$9.
57. John Baden, 1823-$2., 1824-$8., 1825-$6., 1826-$8.
58. Nathan Turk, 1823-$6., 1824-$13., 1825-$12., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$8.
59. Elisha Larkin, 1823-$2.50, 1824-$$10.50, 1825-$16., 1826-$12., 1827-$10.
60. Samuel Avis, 1823-$10., 1824-$14., 1825-$12., 1826-$9., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
61. William Gannon, 1823-$8., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$20., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
62. Daniel Johnston, 1823-$10., 1824-$20., 1825-$20., 1826-$20., 1827-$15., 1828-$20.
63. Ebenezer Cox, 1823-$10., 1824-$10., 1825-$5.
64. Orson Bestor, 1823- $10., 1824-$15.
65. James Steadman, 1823-$4.
66. Anthony Belsterling, 1823-$6., 1824-$16., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
67. James Coates, 1823-$5., 1824-$17., 1825-$15., 1826-$16., 1827-$12., 1828-$16.
68. Michael Gompp, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
69. Daniel Cramer, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$4.
70. William Sappinton, 1823-$8., 1824-$18., 1825-$18., 1826-$18., 1827-$18., 1828-$18.
71. Nathan Yeamans, 1823-$8., 1824-$12., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$8.
72. William Phelam, 1823-$4., 1824-$10., 1825-$8., 1826-$3., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
73. Roger Jones, 1823-$8., 1824-$4.
74. George Little, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$16., 1826-$8., 1827-$12.
75. James Pryor, 1823-$8., 1824-$12., 1826-$12.
76. M. Britenbaug, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$16.
77. Thomas Eamshaw, 1823-$4.
78. William Read, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$12.
79. Frederick Stephenson, 1823-$4., 1824-$2.
80. David Claspey, 1823-$4., 1824-$4., 1825-$4., 1826-$2., 1827-$4., 1828-$4.
81. Asahel Davis, 1823-$4., 1824-$12.50, 1825-$2.50.
82. John Crutehly, 1823-$3., 1824-$4.50, 1825-$3.
83. John Best, 1823-$3., 1824-$6., 1825-$7.50, 1826-$4.50,----------1828-$3.
84. John H. Hall, 1823-$37.50, 1824-$7.50.
85. Nathaniel French, 1823-$8., 1824-$20., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
86. Pelatiah Thompson, 1823-$4., 1824-$8., 1825-$16., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$20.
87. William Burke, 1823-$4., 1824-$8., 1825-$4., 1826-$16., 1827-$18., 1828-$20.
88. Jacob Coons, 1823-$6., 1824-$12., 1825-$6., 1826-$3.
89. Jeffrey Carlisle, 1823-$2., 1824-$5., 1825-$4., 1826-$4., 1827-$4., 1828-$4.
90. Thomas Spriggs, 1823-$2., 1824-$5., 1825-$4., 1826-$2., 1827-$4., 1828-$4.
91. George Compton, 1823-$3., 1824-$7.50, 1825-$5.50, 1826-$3., 1827-$6., 1828-$7.50.
92. Ignatius McItee, 1823-$3.
93. Michael Cooke, 1823-$6., 1824-$6., 1825-$9.,--------1827-$2.
94. Joseph Hoffman, 1824-$18., 1825-$3., 1826-$3., 1827-$12.
95. Nahum W. Patch, 1824-$12.
96. James Fisher, 1823-$8., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$12.
97. Michael Derry, 1824-$2., ----------- ---------- ------------ 1828-$9.
98. Levi Steadman, 1824-$4.50, 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$7.50, 1828-$9.
99. Henry Miller, 1824-$12., 1825-$3., 1826-$5., 1827-$20., 1828-$20.
100. Robert Dirke, 1824-$16., 1825-$17., 1826-$20., 1827-$20., 1828-$20.
101. Samuel Hobbs, 1824-$16., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$16., 1828-$16.
102. John Mallory, 1824-$4.
103. Benjamin Wintzell, 1824-$12., 1825-$6., 1826-$18., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
104. James Hughes, 1824-$7.50.
105. Charles Staley, 1824-$20., 1825-$20.
106. David Adams, 1824-$6., 1825-$4.50, 1826-$6., 1827- $6., 1828-$6.
107. Martin Hartman, 1824-$8., 1825-$6., 1826-$8., 1827-$8., 1828-$6.
108. Thomas Mallory, 1824-$12., 1825-$9., 1826-$5., 1827-$8., 1828-$6.
109. Samuel McDowell, 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$16.
110. Richard Martin, 1824-$16.
111. Jacob Coons 3rd., 1824-$1.50, 1825-$3.
112. Christopher Kreps, 1824-$9., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
113. Daniel Border, 1824-$24., 1825-$24., 1826-$6.
114. Meshac Kirby, 1824-$12., 1825-$12., 1826-$9., 1827-$12., 1828-$18.
115. Joshua Reily, 1824-$7.50, 1825-$10., 1826-$7.50, 1827-$7.50, 1828-$7.50.
116. Edmund Barber, 1824-$3.
117. Michael Milhorn, 1824-$15., 1825-$16., 1826-$12., 1827-$16., 1828-$16.
118. Thomas Stipes, 1823-$3., 1824-$16., 1825-$16., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$8.
119. Jacob Coons Jr., 1826-$3.
120. George Rowles, 1824-$5.
121. Timothy Steadman, 1824-$1.50, 1825-$3., 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
122. John Tally, 1824-$9., 1825-$10.50, 1826-$6.
123. Alva Keep, 1824-$9., 1825-$12., 1826-$6.
124. John G. Unseld, 1824-$6., 1825-$4., 1826-$12.
125. M. F. A. Pollock, 1824-$6., 1825-$4., 1826-$4., 1827-$1.
126. Alexander Nunamaker, 1824-$4.50, 1825-$6., 1826-$1.50, 1827-$3., 1828-$4.50.
127. John Garrett, 1824-$16.
128. James Thropp, 1824-$9., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
129. Joseph Baylis, 1824-$2.
130. Jacob Engles, 1824-$4., 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
131. George Hawkin, 1824-$3., ------------1826-$18., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
132. Abraham Rodrock, 1824-$1.50, 1825-$6., 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
133. William Crusin, 1824-$5., 1825-$4.50, 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
134. Singleton Chambers, 1824-$4., 1825-$5., 1826-$18., 1827-$10., 1828-$8.
135. Charles Fouke, 1824-$10., 1825-$10., 1826-$20.
136. James Green, 1824-$3.
137. George Bryson, 1824-$10., 1825-$20., 1826-$25.
138. Jacob Board, 1824-$4.50, 1825-$4.50.
139. Levi Hall, 1824-$5., 1825-$9., 1826-$3., 1827-$3.
140. Samuel Cox, 1824-$10., 1825-$10., 1826-$20., 1827-$20., 1828-$15.
141. Jonah M. Tompkins, 1823-$4., 1824-$8., 1825-$6.
142. Archibald McOlelland, 1824-$6., 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$12.
143. John Spangler, 1824-$2.50.
144. Hiram Pryor, 1824-$4.
145. John Reiley, 1824-$3.,----------1826-$6., 1827-$2.
146. Joseph Reiley, 1824-$2.50.
147. John Piles, 1825-$12., 1826-$12., 1827-$5.50, 1828-$23.
148. Joseph Martin, 1825-$4.
149. David Hoffman, 1825-$6.
150. Raleigh Coons, 1825-$3.
151. Shadrack Penn, 1825-$9., 1826-$10., 1827-$8., 1828-$4.
152. .Amasa SV. Mars, 1825-$16., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1829-$16.
153. Benjamin Stipes, 1825-$12., 1826-$16., 1827-$16., 1828-$12.
154. John Chambers, 1825-$6., 1826-$9., 1827-$8.33, 1828-$12.
155. John Baylis, 1825-$2., 1826-$6., 1827-$8., 1828-$6.
156. Jacob Shough, 1825-$5., 1826-$9.
157. Daniel Crawford, 1825-$3., 1826-$6., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
158. Joseph Griffith, 1825-$6., 1826-$12., 1827-$3.
159. Zadock Butt, 1825-$6., 1826-$12., 1827-$3.
160. Robert Blanchard, 1825-$6., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
161. Amos Sigler, 1825-$6., 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
162. John Thropp, 1825-$3.
163. Jeremiah Stevens, 1825-$4., 1826-$8., 1827-$6., 1828-$10.
164. Philip Cramer, 1825-$4., 1826-$8.
165. Ad. Rhulman, 1826-$12., 1827-$12., 1828-$4.
166. Richard A. Waters, 1826-$15., 1827-$11.25, 1828-$6.
167. Richard Crusin, 1826-$6.
168. Edmond Chambers, 1826-$7., 1827-$12., 1828-$12.
169. Zachariah Garnes, 1826-$7., 1827-$4., 1828-$6.
170. Mathias Spangler, 1826-$10., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
171. Charles F. Clewell, 1826-$6., 1827-$8., 1828-$8.
172. Stedson Bisbee, 1826-$20., 1827-$12.
173. John Weaning, 1826-$15., 1827-$12., 1828-$8.
174. Joseph Davis, 1826-$6.
175. John Best, 1826-$3., 1827-$6., 1828-$6.
176. Daniel McFaden, 1826-$15., 1827-$18., 1828-$16.
177. William Bateman, 1826-$3., 1827-$12., 1828-12.
178. Paul Washburn, 1827-$13.50.
179. George Nunamaker, 1827-$3., 1828-$3.
180. James Shubridge, 1827-$12., 1828-$6.
181. George Engles, 1827-$8., 1828-$6.
182. Thomas Steadman, 1827-$6., 1828-$15.
183. Joseph Spencer, 1826-$1.50, 1827-$3.
184. Horatio Hobbs, 1827-$9., 1828-$3.
185. John Cable, 1827-$6., 1828-$4.50.
186. George H. Butler, 1827-$1.
187. James Clarke, 1826-$5., 1827-$20., 1828-$20.
188. John Avis, 1827-$2.
189. Jacob Forman, 1827-$12., 1828-$16.
190. John Chapman, 1827-$4., 1828-$3.
191. James Near, 1827-$9.
192. Allen McBee, 1826-$4.50, 1827-$4., 1828-$4.
193. Jacob Mong, 1827-$5.
194. Abraham Berlin, 1827-$6., 1828-$1.50.
195. Isaac Jackson, 1827-$2., 1828-$4.
196. Joseph Taylor, 1827-$1.50.
197. Hiram McBride, 1827-$2., 1828-$4.
198. William Spencer, 1827-$4.50, 1828-$4.50.
199. Ferdinand Stephenson, 1827-$12., 1828-$21.
200. Samuel Kilham, 1827-$6., 1828-$12.
201. William Yeamans, 1826-$3., 1827-$4., 1828-$14.
202. Washington Busey, 1827-$8., 1828-$16.
203. Eli B. Cogsill, 1827-$2., 1828-$4.
204. Edwin Tucker, 1827-$6., 1828-$12.
205. George Brua, 1827-$8.
206. John Bowers, 1827-$2.50, 1828-$7.50.
207. Berryman Brua, 1828-$12.
208. James Cooke, 1828-$6.
209. Joseph Wright, 1828-$1.
210. Erasmus Bell, 1828-$3.
211. John Hall, 1828-$2.
212. Frederick Houk, 1828- $2.50.
213. Thomas Melvin, 1828-$4.
214. Israel Parsons, 1828-$5.

3 comments:

Unknown said...

Great posting and research. Thank you so much. I am working on research on my ancestors John and Lydia Peacher, boater, miller, that purchased and sold Virginius Island, the Old Furnace property, and property in Loudoun County where he opperated and/or build mills during his adult life.

Kim Myers - kimemyers@comcast.net

Dennis Segelquist said...

Thank you for your April 9th, 2008 post on Surnames in Harper’s Ferry. My ancestor Francis Duke lived there and worked as a blacksmith/gunsmith in the arsenal and lived in a government house on Virginius Island. I see from your post that his brother John Duke is listed. I guess because Francis didn’t own the building in which he lived, he wasn’t listed. If you wish to find out about the Duke Family in Harper’s Ferry there’s a section entitled “The Harper’s Ferry Dukes” pp. 302-04 in Samuel Gordon Smyth’s book, A genealogy of the Duke-Shepherd-Van Metre family : from civil, military, church, and family records and documents
Lancaster, Pa.: New Era Print Co., 1909. This book has been digitized and can be found in several free library databases and on-line.

Anonymous said...

Please ignore the "anonymous" above; my name and email address are at the end of this message.

The "John Garrett" of the rent list (he's number 127) is my g.g.grandfather, Johnson Garrett; he was a musketstocker at the Ferry in the 18-teens to 1824 (and is called such in the 1820 census). I've seen microfilm of Treasury pay records for him ca 1816 (75 cents per stock). Many of his craft were essentially put of business by the efficiency of the invention of the eccentric lathe; this device radically reduced the time required to rough out the stock of a musket!

Johnson Garrett's eldest daughter, Olive Virginia Garrett
(1821-1869), married my g.grandfather, Andrew Jackson Wright (1817-1858); he is listed in the 1850 census of Harpers Ferry as an armorer. In fact, he was foreman of the forging shop and a councilman of the town council of Harpers Ferry in 1855. Additionallly, he was active in a variety of causes, both political (Democratic delegate, for example) and social (Sons of Temperance, for example) - too many to list here. An older brother, Jerome Brent Wright, was also a gunsmith in Harpers Ferry, then Clarksburg, then Minnesota (where he moved after the Civil War).

The youngest daughter of Andrew Jackson Wright and Olive Virginia Garrett was my paternal grandmother, Mary Arnett Wright (1856-1931). NOTE: Both Garrett and Wright are mentioned briefly in Merritt Roe Smith's "Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology" (although Smith misread an old handwritten record and records Garrett's surname as "Ganett."

I have extensively researched these families (and am in possession of sundry family records, including the Garrett-Wright family bible (copyright 1845). Presently, I'm consolidating 30 years of research on these families and hope to publish results of my research in the next year or so.

Thanks for the "rent" information.

H. R. Irwin
[gen-roots|at|comcast.net]