Saturday, June 28, 2008

Names of Dartmoor Prison-Page 2.

In page one we talked about the men who either died or came home from Dartmoor and their wife’s., we left off with the list of “American Deaths At The Dartmoor Depot During The War of 1812.” This list will continue here, after the list I will talk about the massacre of April 6, 1815. This page will have a report on the massacre and the names of the Americans and British soldiers who give statements at the enquiry, and a lot more.

Note. Those of you who may have a need to write to Ron Joy may do so at: ronjoy1@tinyworld.co.uk and for those of you who may need some help from me may write to me at: dsegelquist1@cox.net

American Deaths At The Dartmoor Depot During The War of 1812.

101. Charles Baker, Prison No. 2942, Ship Atalante, Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 19, Died on Jan. 30, 1815.

102. Josh Glodding, Prison No. 2957, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Seamen, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 31, Died on Mar. 14, 1815.

103. Ed Powsland, Prison No. 2990, Ship Frolic, Rank Seamen, Hometown Beverly, Age 45, Died on Jun. 8, 1815.

104. Rich Studdy, Prison No. 3035, Ship America, Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 30, Died on Nov. 3, 1814.

105. Henry Holding, Prison No. 3054, Ship Sultan, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 27, Died on Mar. 6, 1815.

106. Jacob Eph Pinkham, Prison No. 3100, Ship Mammouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 22, Died on Sept. 25, 1814.

107. John Collins, Prison No. 3103, Ship Mammouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 24, Died on Oct. 8, 1814.

108. John Haywood, Prison No. 3134, Ship Scipion, Rank Seamen, Hometown Maryland, Age 25, Died on Apr. 6, 1815.

109. William Williams, Prison No. 3141, Ship Rebecca, Rank Seamen, Hometown Georgetown, Died on Oct. 27, 1814.

110. Henry Sherriden, Prison No. 3187, Ship Scipion, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 22, Died on Jan. 24, 1815.

111. Peter Barry, Prison No. 3222, Ship Jalouse, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 39, Died on Nov. 26, 1814.

112. William Meads, Prison No. 3271, Ship Snapdragon, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 20, Died on Jul 24, 1815.

113. J. Pettingall, Prison No. 3297, Ship Enterprise, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 18, Died on Oct. 7, 1814.

114. Josh Windyer, Prison No. 3376, Ship Growler, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 21, Died on Jan 6, 1815.

115. Thomas Jones, Prison No. 3434, Ship Growler, Rank Cook, Hometown Baltimore, Age 38, Died on Feb. 23, 1815.

116. J. Williams, Prison No. 3442, Ship Clorinde, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marthas Vineyard, Age 26, Died on Feb. 1, 1815.

117. John Bateman, Prison No. 3459, Ship Chasseur, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 18, Died on Nov. 23, 1814.

118. Henry Thompson, Prison No. 3470, Ship Prince, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 28, Died on Feb. 21, 1815.

119. Dan Nash, Prison No. 3485, Ship Prince, Rank Seamen, Hometown Dorset, Age 31, Died on Feb 14, 1814.

120. John Davenport, Prison No. 3522, Ship Sabine, Rank Seamen, Hometown Easthaven, Age 21, Died on Jun. 10, 1815.

121.Placid Lovely, Prison No. 3544, Ship Hawk, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Orleans, Age 29, Died on Nov. 1, 1814.

122. William Coleman, Prison No. 3547, Ship Hawk, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 21, Died on Nov. 5, 1814.

123. Lewis Brien, Prison No. 3549, Ship Hawk, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 24, Died on Nov. 5, 1814.

124. Sam Harrison, Prison No. 3571, Ship Hawk, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 21, Died on Jan. 6, 1815.

125. William Johnson, Prison No. 3574, Ship William, Rank Seamen, Hometown Charlestown, Age 25, Died on Nov. 2, 1814.

126. Henry Burbidge, Prison No. 3582, Ship Greyhound, Rank Seamen, Hometown Washington, Age 26, Died on Dec. 25, 1814.

127. Jacob Peterson, Prison No. 3588, Ship John, Rank Seamen, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 22, Died on Nov. 4, 1814.

128. Daniel Henry, Prison No. 3595, Ship Frolic, Rank Prize Master, Hometown Salem, Age 22, Died on Jan. 25, 1815.

129. Lawrence Peterson, Prison No. 3629, Ship Nonsuch, Rank Seamen, Hometown unknown, Age unknown, Died on Jan. 8, 1814.

130. John Thomas, Prison No. 3656, Ship Albert Gerry, Rank Seamen, Hometown unknown, Age unknown, Died on Oct. 25, 1814.

131. Nath Curren, Prison No. 3733, Ship Lizard, Rank Gunner, Hometown Salem, Age 22, Died on Jun. 1, 1815.

132. John Kelley, Prison No. 3756, Ship Alfred, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 62, Died on Mar. 29, 1815.

133. John Raysden, Prison No. 3795, Ship Pike, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 32, Died on Feb. 14, 1815.

134. Peter Amos, Prison No. 3821, Ship Invincible, Rank Passenger, Hometown Marthas Vineyard, Age 22, Died on Feb. 19, 1815.

135. Albert Mingo, Prison No. 3827, Ship Quiz, Rank Passenger, Hometown New Orleans, Age 29, Died on Oct. 25, 1814.

136. Thomas Parker, Prison No. 3842, Ship Dominique, Rank Seamen, Hometown Delaware, Age 22, Died on Nov 5, 1814.

137. Uriel King, Prison No. 3847, Ship Dominique, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 22, Died on Feb. 3, 1815.

138. James Barnett, Prison No. 3862, Ship Busy, Rank Mate, Hometown Pennsylvania, Age 56, Died on Dec. 8, 1814.

139. Lewis Stove, Prison No. 3874, Ship Ticker, Rank Seamen, Hometown Conn., Age 32, Died on Nov. 21, 1814.

140. Charles Monte, Prison No. 3879, Ship Fame, Eank Seamen, Hometown San Antonio, Age 22, Died on Feb. 21, 1815.

141. Abm Tomkins, Prison No. 3896, Ship Governor Shelby, Rank Seamen, Home Town New York, Age 36. Died on Nov. 3, 1814.

142. Peter Birch, Prison No. 3900, Ship Prosperity, Rank Seamen, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 57, Died on Mar. 13, 1815.

143. James Cateret, Prison No. 3901, Ship Mary, Rank Seamen, Hometown Talbot, Age 22, Died on Nov. 11, 1814.

144. John Washington, Prison No. 3936, Ship Rolla, Rank Seamen, Hometown Savannah, Age 25, Died on Apr. 6, 1815.

145. Tim Gardner, Prison No. 3953, Ship Rolla, Rank Seamen, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 19, Died on Jan. 15, 1815.

146. William Gibson, Prison No. 3981, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Died on Oct. 22, 1814.

147. John Turney, Prison No. 3985, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 23, Died on Apr. 5, 1815.

148. John Gladding, Prison No. 4011, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Gunner, Hometown New Jersey, Age 37, Died on Mar. 14, 1815.

149. Sam Lilley, Prison No. 4030, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 19, Died on May 16, 1815.

150. Francis Hobday, Prison No. 4041, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Marine, Hometown Gloster, Age 25, Died on Feb. 24, 1815.

151. David Read, Prison No. 4069, Ship Leicester, Rank Seamen, Hometown Wiscasset, Age 21, Died on Nov. 14, 1814.

152. Richard Smith, Prison No. 4194, Unit General Kemph, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 24, Died on Apr. 14, 1815.

153. James Tucker, Prison No. 4219, Ship Liberty, Rank Seamen, Hometown Long Island, Age 24, Died on Apr. 28, 1815.

154. John Brissons, Prison No. 4231, Ship Bunker Hill, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 32, Died on Jan. 24, 1815.

155. Charles Williams, Prison No. 4236, Ship Pilot, Rank Seamen, Hometown New London, Age 22, Died on Mar. 9, 1815.

156. John Carson, Prison No. 4326, Ship Fiere Facias, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Orleans, Age 26, Died on Oct. 16, 1814.

157. Richard Smides, Prison No. 4333, Ship Flash, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 17, Died on Mar. 6, 1815.

158. Sam Boardby, Prison No. 4356, Ship Fiere Facias, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 29, Died on Mar. 29, 1815.

159. Isaac Harman, Prison No. 4423, Ship Elbridge Gerry, Rank Q. Master, Hometown Mass., Died on Nov. 9, 1814.

160. John Long, Prison No. 4460, Ship Fame, Rank Seamen. Hometown Mass., Age 21, Died on May 29, 1815.

161. David Simonds, Prison No. 4479, Ship Enterprise, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 18, Died on Jan. 22, 1815.

162. Joseph Lackey, Prison No. 4486, Ship Enterprise, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 30, Died on Feb. 4, 1815.

163. Thomas Cooper, Prison No. 4549, Ship Union, Rank 2nd. Mate, Hometown Mass., Age 34, Died on Nov. 8, 1814.

164. Isaac Jones, Prison No. 4556, Ship Hussar, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age, 22, Died on Jan. 23, 1815.

165. William Brown, Prison No. 4628, Ship Ulysses, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 30, Died Jul. 20, 1815.

166. James O. Cussar, Prison No. 4705, Ship Volunteer, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 39, Died Dec. 7, 1814.

167. Stephen Jones, Prison No. 4707, Ship Volunteer, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 27, Died on Nov. 4, 1814.

168. James Jones, Prison No. 4718, Ship Hussar, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 27, Died on May 27, 1815.

169. Joshua Fowler, Prison No. 4730, Ship Theban, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 30, Died on Jan. 30, 1815.

170. Gideon Porter, Prison No. 4737, Ship Acteon, Rank Seamen, Hometown Newport, Age 32, Died on Mar. 22, 1815.

171. Jerry Gardner, Prison No. 4739, Ship A Brig, Rank Seamen, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 27, Died on Mar. 1, 1815.

172. William Adam, Prison No. 4755, Ship Africa, Rank Seamen, Hometown Colchester, Age 22, Died on Mar 15, 1815.

173. Thomas Greaves, Prison No. 4785, Ship Port Manhon, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 28, Died on Feb. 23, 1815.

174. Jacob Sawyer, Prison No. 4788, Ship Impressed, Rank Seamen, Hometown Providence, Age 27, Died on Oct. 25, 1814.

175. James Knabbs, Prison No. 4798, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 22, Died on Feb. 26, 1815.

176. Pedro Joseph, Prison No. 4810, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Guadaloupe, Age 26, Died on Feb. 25, 1815.

177. N. Mendoza, Prison No. 4811, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Carthegena, Age 28, Died on Oct. 25, 1814.

178. St Yago Compichi, Prison No. 4820, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Carthagena, Age 18, Died on Jan. 16, 1815.

179. Amb Leman, Prison No. 4824, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Carthagena, Age 19, Died on Oct. 24, 1814.

180. Jose Almeno, Prison No. 4825, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Carthagena, Age 16, Died on Nov. 3, 1814.

181. Martin Aubury, Prison No. 4826, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown Carthagena, Age 19, Died on Feb. 17, 1815.

182. John Johannes, Prison No. 4836, Ship President, Rank Seamen, Hometown St Thomas, Age 55, Died on Jan 8, 1815.

183. John Jennings, Prison No. 4846, Ship Hawke, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marthas Vineyard, Age 18, Died on Feb. 22, 1815.

184. William Adams, Prison No. 4848, Ship Hawk, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 22, Died on Apr. 24, 1815.

185. Eben. Simonds, Prison No. 4850, Ship give himself up., Rank Seamen, Hometown Newburyport, Age 20,

186. James Adams, Prison No. 4851, Ship Greyhound, Hometown North Carolina, Age. 20, Died on Nov. 6, 1814.

187. Edw. Evans, Prison No. 4853, Ship North Star, Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 27, Died on Jan. 5, 1815.

188. Luke Rogers, Prison No. 4856, Ship Fairy, Rank Seamen, Hometown North Carolina, Age 24, Died on Nov. 13, 1814.

189. Jacob Moral, Prison No. 4871, Ship Fox, Rank Mass., Hometown Mass., Age 22, Died on Apr. 27, 1815.

190. William Loveridge, Prison No. 4884, Ship Saratoga, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 18, Died on Apr. 6, 1815.

191. Charles Fisher, Prison No. 4886, Ship Saratoga, Rank Seamen, Hometown Delaware, Age 33, Died on Apr. 6, 1815.

192. James Congdon, Prison No. 4893, Ship Goree, Rank Seamen, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 19, Died on Nov. 11, 1814.

193. John Menillo, Prison No. 4917, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Seamen, Hometown Fallspoint Baltimore, Age 21, Died on Nov. 18, 1814.

194. Josh Gwynn, Prison No. 4930, Ship Herald, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 18, Died on Feb. 22, 1815.

195. Asha Allan, Prison No. 4956, Ship Herald, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Bedford, Age 37, Died on Nov. 14, 1814.

196. Nicholas Smith, Prison No. 4958, Ship Herald, Rank Seamen, Hometown Richmond, Age 25, Died on Jan. 9, 1815.

197. John Baptiste Allen, Prison No. 4967, Ship Herald, Hometown Africa, Age 40, Died on Nov. 21, 1814.

198. Isaac Simondson, Prison No. 4995, Ship Invincible, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 20, Died on Nov. 20, 1814.

199. Anthony Lamb, Prison No. 5008, Ship Grand Turk, Rank Seamen, Hometown Conn., Age 19, Died on Nov. 22, 1814.

200. D. Miller, Prison No. 5014, Ship Mammouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Jersey, Age 26, Died on Feb. 23, 1815.

201. Sol Marshall, Prison No. 5019, Ship Mammouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 27, Died on Nov. 20, 1814.

202. M. Gennifon, Prison No. 5025, Ship Syren, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 25, Died on Nov. 12, 1814.

203. John Polland, Prison No. 5052, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Brazil, Age 27, Died on Nov. 23, 1814.

204. Isacher Bray, Prison No. 5053, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Cape Ann, Age 23, Died on Nov. 20, 1814.

205. Josh Palmer, Prison No. 5054, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Portsmouth, Age 18, Died on Nov. 17, 1814.

206. Amos De Bates, Prison No. 5063, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Hamburg Con. Age 22, Died on Nov. 18, 1814.

207. Joel Perigo, Prison No. 5064, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Conn., Age 28, Died on Nov. 24, 1814.

208. Sylas Denham, Prison No. 5074, Ship Ida, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 21, Died on Nov. 14, 1814.

209. John Adams, Prison No. 5089, Ship Ida, Rank Sailing Mate, Hometown Boston, Age 27, Died on Dec. 3, 1814.

210. Eman Jose, Prison No. 5095, Ship David Porter, Rank Seamen, Hometown Portugal, Age 20, Died on Nov. 25, 1814.

211. David Taylor, Prison No. 5105, Ship David Porter, Rank Seamen, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 19, Died on Jun. 19, 1815.

212. Josh Andrews, Prison No. 5108, Ship David Porter, Rank Seamen, Hometown Ipswich, Age 21, Died on Nov. 21, 1814.

213. William Harris, Prison No. 5116, Ship Portsmouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown Portsmouth, Age 16, Died on Nov. 24, 1814.

214. Ramos Coffee, Prison No. 5118, Ship Portsmouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York. Age 26, Died on Dec 4, 1814.

215. Thomas Rowlinson, Prison No. 5137, Ship Calabria, Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 22, Died on Nov. 26, 1814.

216. George West, Prison No. 5140, Ship give himself up., Rank Seamen, Hometown Delaware, Age 48, Died on Jan. 27, 1815.

217. Rich Holstein, Prison No. 5144, Ship Baroness Longerville, Rank Seamen, Hometown 33, Age 33, Died on May 25, 1815.

218. James Roth, Prison No. 5232, Ship Mary, Rank Seamen, Hometown Norwich, Age 25, Died on Dec. 29, 1814.

219. James Davis, Prison No. 5240, Ship York Town, Rank Seamen, Hometown Savannah, Age 25, Died on Feb. 26, 1815.

220. Benjamin Marshall, Prison No. 5245, Ship Minden, Rank Seamen, Hometown Unknown, Age 23, Died on Mar. 27, 1815.

221. William Mista, Prison No. 5247, Ship Atlantic Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 36, Died on Feb. 13, 1815.

222. Thomas Thompson, Prison No. 5314, Ship Thomas, Rank Seamen, Hometown Brooklin, Age 32, Died on Jun. 16, 1815.

223. Thomas Jarvis, Prison No. 5321, Ship Industry, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 18, Died on Jan. 25, 1815.

224. William Packer, Prison No. 5375, Ship Derby, Rank Seamen, Hometown Barnstaple, Age 20, Died on Nov. 28, 1814.

225. David Turner, Prison No. 5376, Ship Derby, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 23, Died on Mar. 17, 1815.

226. William Smart, Prison No. 5439, Ship Elephant, Rank Seamen, Hometown Virginia, Age 23, Died on Dec. 5, 1814.

227. Rueben Mitchell, Prison No. 5500, Ship No. 2 Gunboat, Rank Gunner, Hometown Maryland, Age 29, Died on May 11, 1815.

228. Richard Robert Lee, Prison No. 5537, Ship Amelia, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 23, Died on Jan. 20, 1815.

229. Joseph Perkins, Prison No. 5553, Ship Lacey, Rank Boy, Hometown Mass., Age 18, Died on Apr. 20, 1815.

230. William Young, Prison No. 5559, Ship Levant, Rank Seamen, Hometown Beverly, Age 29, Died on Jan. 21, 1815.

231. Thomas Simmonds, Prison No. 5571, Ship Saratoga, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Bedford, Age 55, Died on Jan. 20, 1815.

232. Sam Tophouse, Prison No. 5604, Ship taken at Washington, Unit Soldier, Hometown Washington, Age 32, Died on Feb 11, 1815.

233. John Butler, Prison No. 5626, Ship Semiramis, Rank Seamen, Hometown Pennsylvania, Age 52, Died on Feb. 23, 1815.

234. P. Queenwell, Prison No. 5629, Ship Walker, Rank Seamen, Hometown Dartmoor, Age 33, Died on Jan. 27, 1815.

235. Martin Sutton, Prison No. 5647, Ship Lion, Rank Seamen, Hometown New Bedford, Age 26, Died on Feb. 22, 1815.

236. Rob Adams, Prison No. 5656, Ship Herald, Rank Seamen, Hometown unknown, Age unknown, Died on Feb. 5, 1815.

237. Veritas Conkland, Prison No. 5657, Ship Herald, Rank Seamen, Hometown New york, Age 20, Died on Jun. 23, 1815.

238. Jesse March, Prison No. 5691, Ship McDonough, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 29, Died On Feb. 5, 1815.

239. Dan Archer, Prison No. 5698, Ship Grand Turk, Rank Prize Master, Hometown Salem Age 22, Died on Jan. 14, 1815.

240. Arch Allen, Prison No. 5706, Ship Harpy, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 20, Died on Mar. 3, 1815.

241. John Devinas, Prison No. 5743, Ship Ohio, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 18, Died on Apr. 12, 1815.

241. Josh Dennings, Prison No. 5744, Ship Ohio, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 26, Died on Apr. 12, 1815.

242. Stephen Stacey, Prison No. 5750, Ship Ohio, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 35, Died on Mar. 16, 1815.

243. George Brown, Prison No. 5788, Ship Ocean, Rank Seamen, Hometown Pennsylvania, Age 31, Died on Feb. 11, 1815.

244. Ebz. Holbrook, Prison No. 5793, Ship Derby, Rank Seamen, Hometown Weymouth, Age 24, Died on Mar. 9, 1815.

245. Sam Williams, Prison No. 5811, Ship Scorpion, Rank Seamen, Hometown Mass., Age 31, Died on Mar. 15, 1815.

246. Moses Bailey, Prison No. 5819, Ship Scorpion, Rank Seamen, Hometown Pennsylvania, Age 21, Died on Feb. 17, 1815.

247. Phillip Blasdon, Prison No. 5839, Unit 4 regiment rifles, Rank Soldier, Hometown New Hampshire, Age 35, Died on Jan. 17, 1815.

248. Shadrach Snell, Prison No. 5842, Unit 1 regiment rifles, Rank Fifer, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 19, Died on Mar. 16, 1815.

249. Smith Sheldon, Prison No. 5847, Unit Militia, Rank Soldier, Hometown Rhode Island, Age 25, Died on Jan. 19, 1815.

250. Elisha Holford, Prison No. 5853, Ship Barfluer, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 19, Died on Jan. 5, 1815.

251. Dan Bodge, Prison No. 5883, Ship Harlequin, Rank Seamen, Hometown Arundel, Age 23, Died on Jan. 16, 1815.

252. John Stone, Prison No. 5888, Ship Harlequin, Rank Seamen, Hometown Arundel, Age 44, Died on Jan. 5, 1815.

253. John Seapatch, Prison No. 5889, Ship Harlequin, Rank Boy, Hometown Mass., Died on Feb 7, 1815.

254. John Wittan, Prison No. 5895, Ship Harlequin, Rank Seamen, Hometown Portsmouth, Age 20, Died on Jan. 18, 1815.

255. Silus Squibb Prison No. 5976, Ship Harpy, Rank Seamen, Hometown New London, Age 21, Died on Mar. 18, 1815.

256. George Noore, Prison No. 6068, Ship Chasseur, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 35, Died on Mar. 29, 1815.

257. William Fernald, Prison No. 6112, Ship Harpy, Rank Prize Master, Hometown Kihi?, Age 24, Died on Jan. 23, 1815.

258. Rich Lee, Prison No. 6126, Ship Grand Turk, Rank Seamen, Hometown Marblehead, Age 25, Died on Jun. 19, 1815.

259. Josh Tremerin, Prison No. 6149, Ship Mars, Rank Seamen, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 19, Died on Jun. 4, 1815.

260. John Flowers, Prison No. 6169, Ship Lion, Rank Seamen, Hometown Boston, Age 56, Died on May 6, 1815.

261. William Robinson, Prison No. 6264, Ship Plutarch, Rank Seamen, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 40, Died on Apr. 18, 1815.

262. Joseph Haycock, Prison No. 6371, Ship Syren, Rank Gunner, Hometown Portland, Age 55, Died on Mar. 20, 1815.

263. J. L. Osborne, Prison No. 6406, Ship Portsmouth, Rank Seamen, Hometown Newburyport, Age 18, Died on May 24, 1815.

264. Josh Salisbury, Prison No. 6442, Ship Jemmett, Rank Passenger, Hometown Newport, Age 22, Died on Mar. 13, 1815.

265. Jacob Hentey, Prison No. 6451, Ship Jemmett, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 17, Died on Apr. 16, 1815.

266. Henry Campbell, Prison No. 6504, Ship give himself up., Rank Seamen, Hometown Delaware, Age 28, Died on Mar. 22, 1815.

267. John Jack, Prison No. 6514, Ship Orantes, Rank Seamen, Hometown Baltimore, Age 36, Died on Mar. 14, 1815.

268. John Peterson, Prison No. 6515, Ship Orantes, Rank Seamen, Hometown Albany, Age 31, Died on Jun 1, 1815.

269. Thomas Jackson, Prison No. 6520, Ship Orantes, Rank Seamen, Hometown New York, Age 14, Died on Apr. 7, 1815.

270. Ed Powsland, Prison No. 2990, Ship Frolic, Rank Seamen, Hometown Beverly, Age 45, Died on Jun. 8, 1815.

271. Josh Gladding, Prison No. 4011, Ship Rattlesnake, Rank Gunner, Hometown New Jersey, Age 37, Died on Mar. 14, 1815.

272. George West, Prison No. 5140, Ship give himself up., Rank Seamen, Hometown Delaware, Age 48, Died on Jan. 27, 1815.

273. John Devinas, Prison No. 5743, Ship General Putnam, Rank Seamen, Hometown Salem, Age 18, Died on April 12, 1815.

Massacre at Dartmoor Prison April 6, 1815.

Note. This information comes from the Library of Congress.

American State Papers, House of Representatives, 14th Congress, 1st Session
Foreign Relations: Volume 4, Pages 19 through 55, No. 281. Great Britain--Massacre at Dartmoor prison.

Note. On April 4, two days before the massacre a large body of the prisoners rushed into the market square, from whence by the regulations of the prison they are excluded, demanding bread instead of biscuit, which had on that day been issued to the officers of the depot, their demands, however, having been then almost immediately complied with, they returned to their own yards; and the use of force was not necessary.

Here is a report by Charles King and Francis Seymour Larpent on the massacre. After the report there will be a list of Americans that were wounded and killed, along with the names who give statements on what they did and saw on that day. There is also a list of British soldiers and ( civilian?) who also give their statements on what did and saw on that day.

The report.

On the evening of the 6th, about six o'clock, it was clearly proved to us that a breach or hole had been made in one of the prison walls, sufficient for a full-sized man to pass, and that others had been commenced in the course of the day, near the same spot, though never completed; that a number of the prisoners were over the railing, erected to prevent them from communicating with the sentinels on the walls which was of course forbidden by the regulations of the prison; and that, in the space between the railing and those walls, they were tearing up pieces of turf, and want only pelting each other in a noisy and disorderly manner; that a much more considerable number of the prisoners were collected together at that tithe in one of their yards, near the place where the breach was effected; and that, although such collection of prisoners was not unusual at other times, (the gambling tables being commonly kept in that part of the yard,) yet, when connected with the circumstances of the breach and the time of the day, which was after the horn (the signal for the prisoners to retire to their respective prisons) had ceased to sound, it became a natural and jut ground of alarm to those who had charge of the depot.

It was also in evidence that, in the building formerly the petty officers prison, but now the guard barrack, which stands hi the yard; to which the hole in the wall would serve as a communication, a part of the arms of the guard who were off duty and were usually kept in the racks; and though there was no evidence that this was, in any respect, the motive which induced the prisoners to make the opening in the, wall, or even that they were ever acquainted with the fact, it naturally became at least a further cause for suspicion and alarm, and an additional reason for precaution.

Upon these grounds, Captain Shortland appears to us to have been justified in giving the order (which about this time lie seeing to have given) to sound the alarm-bell, the usual signal for collecting the officers of the depot, and putting the military on the alert. However reasonable and justifiable this was as a measure of precaution, the effects produced thereby in the prisons (but which could not have been intended) were most unfortunate, and deeply to be regretted.

A considerable number of prisoners in the yards where no disturbance existed before, and who sound of the bell rushed back from curiosity as it appears, towards the gates where by that time the crowd, had assembled; and many who were at the time absent from their yards, were also, from the plan of the prison, compelled, in order to reach their own homes, to pass by the same spot. And thus, that which was merely a measure of precaution, in its operation increased the evil it was intended to prevent. Almost at the same instant that the alarm-bell rang, (but whether before or subsequent is, upon the evidence, doubtful, though Captain Shortland states it positively as one of his further reasons for causing it o ring,) some one or more of the prisoners broke the iron chain which was the only fastening of No. 1 gate,1eading into the market square, by means of an iron bar; and a very considerable number of the prisoners immediately rushed towards that gate, and many of them began to press forward; as fast as the opening would permit into the square. There was no direct proof before us of previous concert or preparation on the part of the prisoners, and no evidence of their intention or disposition to effect their escape on this occasion, excepting that which arose by inference from the whole of the above detailed circumstances connected together.

The natural and almost irresistible inference to be drawn1 however, froth the conduct of the prisoners, by. Captain Shortland and the military, was, that an intention on the part of the prisoners to escape was on the point of being carried into execution, and it was at least certain that they were, by force, passing beyond the limits prescribed to them, at a time when they ought to have been quietly going in for the night. It was also in evidence that the outer gates of the market square were usually opened about this time to let the bread-wagon pass and repass to the store, although, at the period in question, they were in fact closed.

Under these circumstances, and with these impressions necessarily operating upon his mind, and the knowledge that, if the prisoners once penetrated through the square, the power of escape was almost to a certainty afforded to them, if they should be so disposed, Captain Shortlaud, in the first instance, proceed down the square, towards the prisoners, having ordered a part of the different guards, to the number of about fifty only at first, (though they were increased afterwards to follow him. For some time both he and Doctor Magrath endeavored, by quiet means and persuasion, to induce the prisoners to retire to their own yards explaining to them the fatal consequences which must ensue if they refused, as the military would, in that case, be necessarily compelled to employ force. The guard was, by this time, formed in the rear of Captain Shortland, about two-thirds of the way down the square: the latter is about one hundred feet broad, and the guards extended nearly all across. Captain Shortland, finding that persuasion was in vain, and that, although some were induced by it to make an effort to retire. others pressed on in considerable numbers, at last ordered about fifteen file of the guard, nearly n front of the gate which had been forced to charge the prisoners back to their own yards.

The prisoner were in some places as near the military that one of the soldiers states he could not come fairly to charge, and the military were unwilling to act against an enemy. Some f the prisoners, also were unwilling and reluctant to retire, and some pushing and straggling ensued between the parties arising party from intention, but mainly from the pressure of those behind preventing those in front from getting back. After some little time, however, this charge appears to have been so far effective, and that with little or no injury to the prisoners as to have driven them for the most part, quite down out of the square, with the exception of a small number, who continued their resistance about No. 1 gate. A grate crowd still remained collected after this in the passage between the square and prisoners yards, and in part of these yards in the vicinity of the gate. This assemblage still refused to withdraw and according to most of the English witnesses, and some of the American, was making a noise, hallooing, insulting, and provoking, and daring the military to fire; and, according to the evidence of several of the soldiers and some others, was pelting the military with large stones, by which some of them were actually struck. This circumstance is, however, denied by many of the American witnesses; and some of the English, upon having the question put to them stated that they saw no stones thrown previously to the firing, although their situation at the time was such as to enable them to see most of the other proceedings in the square.

Under these circumstances the firing commenced. With regard to any order having been given to fire, the evidence is very contradictory; several of the Americans swear very positively, that Captain Shortland gave that order; but the manner in which from the confusion of the moment, they describe this part of the transaction; is so different in its details, that it is very difficult to reconcile their testimony. Any of the soldiers, and other English witnesses, heard the word given by some one; but no one of them can swear it was by Captain Shortland, or by any one in particular; and some amongst whom is the officer commanding the gard, think, if Captain Shortland had given such an order, that they must have heard it, which they did not. In addition to this, Captain Shortland denies the fact; and from the situation in which he appears to have been placed at the time, even according to the American witnesses, in front of the soldiers, it may appear somewhat improbable that he such an order. But, however it may remain a matter of doubt whether the firing first began in the square by order, or was a spontaneous act of the soldiers themselves, it seems clear that it was continued and renewed both there and else where which out orders; and that on the platforms, and in several places about the prison, it was certainly commenced without any authority.

The fact of an order having been given at first, provided the firing was under the existing circumstances, justifiable, dose not appear very material in any other point of view then as showing a want of discipline and self possession in the troops, if they should have fired without orders. With regard to the above most important consideration of “ whether the firing was justifiable or not,” we are of opinion, under all the circumstances of the case, from the apprehension which the soldiers might fairly entertain, owning to the number and conduct of the prisoners, that this firing to a certain extent, was justifiable in a military point of view, in order to intimidate the prisoners, and compel them thereby to desist from acts of violence, and to retire as they were ordered, from a situation in which the responsibility of the agent and military could not permit them with safety to remain.

From the fact of the crowd being to close, and the firing, at first, being attended with very little injury, it appears probable that a large proportion of the muskets were, as stated by one or two of the witnesses, leveled over the heads of the prisoners; a circumstance, in some respects, to be lamented, as it induced them to cry out “ blank cartridges,” and merely irritated and encouraged them to renew their insults to the soldiery, which produced a repetition of the firing in a manner much more destructive.

The firing in the square having continued for some time, by which several of the prisoners sustained injuries, the greater part of them appear to have been running back with the utmost confusion and precipitation to their respective prison, and the cause for further firing seems, at this prison to have ceased. It appears, accordingly, that Captain Shortland was in the market square exerting himself and giving orders to the effect, and that Lieutenant Fortye had succeeded in stopping the fire of his part of the guard. Under these circumstance it is very difficult to find any justification for the renewal and continuance of the firing, which certainly took place both in the prison yards and elsewhere, though we have some evidence of subsequent provocation given to the military, and resistance to the turnkeys in shutting the prisons, and of stones being thrown out from within the prison doors.

The subsequent firing appears rather to have arisen from the state of individual irritation and exasperation on the part of the soldiers who followed the prisoners into their yards, and from the absence of nearly all the officers, who might have restrained it, as well as from the grate difficulty of putting and end to a firing which once commenced under such circumstances. Captain Shortland was from this time, busily occupied with the turnkeys in the square, receiving and taking care of the wounded. Ensign White remained with his guard at the breach, and Lieutenants Avecyne and Fortye, the only other subalterns known to have been present, continued in the square with the main bodies of their respective guards.

The time of the day, which was the officers dinner hour, will, in some measure, explain this, as it caused the absence of every officer from the prison whose presence was not indispensable there. And this circumstance, which has been urged as an argument to prove the intention of the prisoners to take this opportunity to escape, tended to increase the confusion, and to prevent those greater exertions being made which might, perhaps, have obviated at least a portion of the mischief which ensued.

At the time that the firing was going on in the square a cross fire was also kept up from several of the platforms on the walls round the prison, where the sentries stand, by straggling parties of soldiers, who ran up there for that purpose. As far as the fire was directed to disperse the men assembled round the breach, ( for which purpose it was most effectual, ) It seems to stand upon the same ground as that in the first instance in the square. But that part which, it is positively sworn, was directed against straggling parties of prisoners running about the yards and endeavoring to enter the few doors which the turnkeys, according to their usual practice, had left open, does seem, as stated, to have been wholly without object or excuse, and to have been a wanton attack upon the lives of defenseless, and at that time unoffending individuals. In the same or evening more sever terms, we must remark upon what was proved as to the firing into the doorways of the prison, more particularly into that of No.3 prison, at a time when the men were in crowds at the entrance.

From the position of the prison and of the door, and from the marks of the balls, which were pointed out to us, as well as from the evidence, it was clear this firing must proceeded from soldiers a very few feet from the doorways; and though it was certainly sworn that the prisoners were at the time of part of the firing at least, continuing to insult, and occasionally to throw stones at the soldiers, and that they were standing in the way of and impeding the turnkey who was there for the purpose of closing the door, yet still there was nothing stated which could in our view, at all justify such excessively harsh and severe treatment of helpless and unarmed prisoners, which all idea of escape was at an end. Under these impressions, we used every endeavor to ascertain if there was at least prospect of identifying any of the soldiers who had been guilty of the particular outrages here alluded to, or of tracing any particular death at that time to the firing of any particular individual, but without success; and all hopes of brining the offenders to punishment would seem to be at an end.

In conclusion, we the undersigned, have only to add, that whilst we lament, as we do most deeply, the unfortunate transaction which has been the subject of this inquiry, we find ourselves totally unable to suggest any steps to be taken as to those parts of it which seem most to call for redress and punishment.

Charles King.
Francis Seymour Larpent.

American Prisoners of War who gave statements to the Enquiry Board on the Massacre of 1815.

Note.Those of you who would like a report one will be provide upon request.

1. Richard Cephus
2. John Odiorne
3. Addison Holmes
4. David Spencer
5. James Greenlaw
6. Thomas Burgess
*7. Enoch Burnham-Statement is given below.
8.Homer Hull
9. John Slater Surname
10. Alexander Marshall
11. Cornelius Rowe
12. William Dewetter
13. Thomas Tindale
14. John C. Rowles
15. Niel McKinnon
16. John G. Gatchell
17. Andrew Davis
18. Gerard Smith
19. Robert Johnson
20. James N. Bushfield
21. William Clements
22. John Hubard
23. James Reeves
24. William Mitchell
25. Lot Davis

Here is a statement given by one of the Americans.

Enoch Burnham, a citizen of the United States, on his oath, saith: That on Thursday, the 6th, day of April instant, about half-past six o’clock in the evening, he went to the railing of the market place, and remained there about half an hour, when he saw a crowd of the prisoners making a noise, the. principal part of them were youngsters, full of mischief, and they came, some of them, between the two railings, and he saw seven or eight go into the market square, but there was no great body there; that at this time he saw some soldiers come down the square, and Captain Shortland with them, and the soldiers charged upon the prisoners, who retreated into No. 1 prison yard, without making any resistance; that this informant remained at the gate when the military began to fire, and at this time there was no crowd of prisoners within the gate—-there might have been forty or fifty men; that when the firing commenced he retreated into the prison yard; and lay down by the wall, and the prisoners who were about the gate also retreated; that this informant lay by the wall about five or seven minutes, when this informant went up by the barrack wall, towards where there was a hole, and the soldiers then began to fire from the ramparts of: the south wall, when he want to No. 7 prison, and got as far, as the steps, when a heavy firing again commenced from the wall, and this informant lay down to save his life for about four or five minutes, and then got into the prison, and was going through to go to his own prison, and had got to the steps, when the firing commenced from the platform next to the south corner; whereupon he retreated into No. 7 again, and went into the north end, and saw one prisoner in the. yard who appeared to be wounded, and he ran back against the wall and he saw several soldiers raise their muskets and fire at him, and he fell immediately, but this informant does not know who the man was; that this informant saw the wounded man lift up his hands towards the soldiers before they fired; that this informant did not see any stones thrown, but he heard some of the youngsters speak bout throwing stones; that he did not hear the word to fire given, and he was near the gratings; when the military first began to fire, they were at some distance from the gratings.

ENOCH BURNHAM.
Sworn before me, JOS. WHITEFORD, Coroner.

These names are of the British soldiers who give their statement to the board of Enquiry on what they saw and did at the time of the massacre.

Note. Those of you who would like a report one will be provide upon request.

1. Thomas Edwards-Private.
2. Samuel White-2nd, Lieutenant.
3. John Mitchell-Clerk to Governor.
4. Richard Arnold-Turnkey.
5. Stephen Hall-Turnkey.
6. George Magrath-Surgeon.
7. John Arnold- Steward.
8. William Gifford-Private, 1st., Somerset Militia.
9. James Groves-Private, 1st., Somerset Militia.
10. Robert Holmden-1 St. Clerk.
11. Robert McFarlane- Asst. surgeon.
12. Joseph Manning- Sergeant, 1st., Somerset Militia.
13. John Tozer-Turnkey.
14. Amos Wheeler-Sergeant, 1st., Somerset Militia.
15. John Saunders-Private, 1st., Somerset Militia.
16. William Smith-Private, 1st., Somerset Militia.
17. John Tutt-Private.
18. William Rowles-Private.
19.John Hamlet- Private.
20. John Williams-Sergeant.
21. John Twyfort Jolliff-Commanding Officer.
22. George Pitt-Sergeant.
23. Henry Burgoyne-Private.
24. Edward Jackson-Private, Derby Militia.
25. George Challacumb-Carter.
26. Samuel Best- Turnkey.
27. Richard Walker-Private, Derby Militia
28. William Norris-Turnkey.
29. John Rodd-Turnkey.
30. Daniel Nicholls-Turnkey.
31. David Pitmore-Turnkey.
32. John French-Turnkey.
33. James Carley-Turnkey.
34. Samuel Morgan-Turnkey.
35. William Wakelin-Turnkey.
36. Henry Wroe-Plumber.
37. John Mitchell-Clerk.
38. Robert Holmden-Clerk.
39. John Bennett-Clerk.
40. George Holland-Bugler.
41. John Collard-Sergeant, 1st., Somerset Militia.
42. Stephen Lapthorn-Private, 1st., Somerset Militia.
43. John Soathern-Private, Derby Militia
44. Samuel White-Ensign
45. Thomas George Shortland-Captain, Rn. Agent of Dartmoor Depot.

Note. Turkeys were the equivalent of the modern Prison Officers and were responsible in all the 7 War Prisons for feeding the prisoners, taking Roll Calls, security in the internal War Prisons and general locking up at the end of each day and were unarmed and in general charge of the internal War Prison.

Here is a statement given by British Turnkey.

Stephen Hall, one of the turnkeys at the prison of war at Dartmoor, on his oath, saith: “That on the 6th day of April instant, about a quarter before seven o’clock in the evening, he went into the market square, and went to the lower gate, when he saw some of the prisoners come over in a body from the wall which separates the barrack yard from the prison, and they came to the gate next to the hospital, an1 forced the gate open; and went up towards the market square; that this informant was close by Captain Shortland in the square, and heard the captain desire them to go back, but they said they would not; that there were some soldiers at this time formed in the market square, and when the prisoners refused to retire they came to a charge, and then this informant went to the rear, when he heard a single musket fire; and at this time he had not heard any person give orders to fire, nor did lie hear any such orders given afterwards; that after the musket was fired he went towards the lodge, sand hear a several muskets fired, and shortly after he heard the captain call for the, turnkeys to bring up the. wounded, when this informant went down and assisted in taking up two wounded men, one of them in the market square and the other in the prison, and he also picked up one man dead in the market square, but he does not know the man; that when this informant saw the prisoners coming across the yard towards the gate, they were behaving in a very riotous manner, and this informant observed that they had some iron bars, and he thinks that three of the men had an iron bar each; that he did not see either of the men attempt to strike with them; and he .did not see either of the prisoners throw any thing towards the military; that this informant heard the a1am-be11 ring just before he saw the prisoners come across the prison and force the gate; that after they had forced the gate this informant persuaded the prisoners. to go back, but they refused to do so; that they made no complaints whatever in this informant’s hearing; that on the 7th day of April instant, he was at the lower gate, when he heard some person who were walking between the railing, and they were talking about a black man that was killed; and this informant heard the prisoners say, if the black man had not been killed he would have killed Captain Shortland, and that he had a knife in his pocket prepared to stab him; that there was no person present with this informant at the time he heard this conversation, and he does not know the prisoners who were talking together.

Stephen Hall.
Sworn before me, JOSEPH WHITEFORD, Coroner.

The Americans prisoners of war who were shot and killed on April 6, 1815.

1. James Mann, Prison No. 970, Ship Siro, Hometown Boston, Age 30.

2. James Tooker Johnson, Prison No. 1347, Ship Paul Jones, Hometown Conn., Age 19.

3. * John Haywood, Prison No. 3134, Ship Scipion, Hometown Maryland, Age 25.

4. John Washington, Prison No. 3936, Ship Rolla, Hometown Savannah, Age 25.

5. William Loveridge, Prison No. 4884, Ship Saratoga, Hometown New York, Age 18.

6. * James Campbell, Prison No. 2647, Ship Voluntaire, Hometown New York Age 34, Died on the 7th., of April

7. * Thomas Jackson, Prison No. 6520, Ship Orontes, Hometown New York, Age 14, Died on the 7th., of April.

Note. The names with a star were impressed onto English Warships and give themselves up rather than fight against their own country men.

List of the Americans that were wounded on April 6, 1815.

1. John Gair, Prison No. 5769, Ship Rambler, Hometown Boston, Age 26, Wounds Amputated thigh.

2. William Penn, Prison No. 1722, Was impressed, Hometown Lancaster county Virginia, Age 26, Wounds Gunshot to thigh.

3. Cornelius Garrison, Prison No. 5003, Ship Invincible, Hometown Baltimore, Age 24, Wounds Gunshot to thigh.

4. Henry Montcalm, Prison No. 3614, Ship G. Tomkins, Hometown Boston, Age 21, Wounds Gunshot to knee.

5. Robert Willet, Prison No. 1965, Gave himself up., Hometown New Borough, Age 21, Wounds Thigh Amputated.

6. John Peach, Prison No. 5326, Ship Enterprize, Hometown Marblehead Mass., Age 17, Wounds Gunshot to thigh.

7. Edward Whittlebank, Prison No. 2148, Gave himself up., Hometown Portsmouth, Age 21, Wounds Bayonet wound to the back.

8. John Turnbull, Prison No. 1881, Ship Albridge Gerry, Hometown Portland, Age 16, Wounds Amputated arm.

9. Phillip Ford, Prison No. 1236, Ship HMS Sultan, Hometown Wilmington, Age 55, Wounds Severely wounded in the back.

10. James Bell, Prison No. 534, Ship Union, Hometown Virginia, Age 27, Wounds Bayonet wounds to the thigh.

11. James Wells, Prison No. 3652, Ship Thorn, Hometown Mass., Age 36, Wounds Gunshot fracture of Sacrum.

12. William Leversage, Prison No. 436, Ship Magdalene, Hometown Pennsylvania, Age 19, Wounds Unknown.

13. Edward Gardner, Prison No. 1024, Ship Joseph, Hometown South Kingston, Age 23, Wounds Gunshot fracture of the left arm.

14. Stephen Phipps, Prison No. 1546, Ship Zebra, Hometown Mass., Age 27, Wounds Bayonet wound in the abdomen.

15. John Roberts ( Black ), Prison No. 486, Give himself up., Hometown Baltimore, Age 21, Wounds Gunshot wound to the thigh.

16. Thomas Smith, Prison No. 1640, Ship Paul Jones, Hometown New York, Age 30, Wounds Amputation of thigh.

17. Caleb Codding, Prison No. 1819, Gave himself up., Hometown Mass., Age 48, Wounds Gunshot wounds to the leg.

18. John Davis, Prison No. 1143, Ship Bunker Hill, Hometown Cawford, Age 22, Wounds Gunshot wound to the thigh.

19. James Esdale/Esdaile, Prison No. 2013, Recaptured, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 25, Wounds Gunshot wounds to hip.

20. Peter Wilson, Prison No. 380, Ship Virginia Planter, Hometown New York, Age 25, Wounds Gunshot wound to the hand.

21. William Blake, Prison No. 2884, Ship Undaunted, Hometown Mass., Age 44, Wounds Bayonet wound.

22. John Hogabets, Prison No. 338, Ship Good Friends, Hometown Philadelphia, Age 25, Wounds Gunshot wound to the hip.

23. Ephraim Lincoln, Prison No. 4153, Ship Argus, Hometown Boston, Age 18, Wounds Gunshot wound to a hip.

24. Thomas Tindley, Prison No. 4493, Ship Enterprize, Hometown Mass., Age 16, Wounds Gunshot wound to a thigh.

25. John Howard, Prison No. 4109, Ship Flash, Hometown Bridgewater, Age 19, wounds Gunshot wound to a leg.

26. Joseph Masick, Prison No. 1229, Gave himself up., Hometown Charlestown, Age 31, Wounds Gunshot wound to a thigh.

27. John Willett, Prison No. 1812, Gave himself up., Hometown Newcastle, Age 32, Wounds Fractured hip and shattered Jaw.

28. Henry Wilson, Prison No. 2662, Gave himself up., Hometown Beachy/, Age 19, Wounds Bayonet wound.

29. Robert Fetters, Prison No. 6123, Ship Betsy, Hometown Bath, Age 22, Wounds Gunshot wound to the penis.

30. John Perry, Prison number is unreadable, Ship HMS Tiger, Hometown unknown, Age unknown, Wounds Gunshot wound to the shoulder.

Note. This is a miscellaneous names list, if you see a name that you would like information on you can write to Ron Joy at the above address, Give full name along with prison number.

1. Prison No. 836 Thomas, Perkins.
2. Prison No. 894 Elyja, Perkins.
3. Prison No. 3748 Henry, Perkins.
4. Prison No. 5685 Samuel, Perkins.
5. Prison No. 5677 Joseph, Perkins.
6. Prison No. 5553 Joseph, Perkins- Died 20 April 1814.
7. Prison No. 5690 George, Perkins.
8. Prison No. 4399 John, Perkins.
9. Prison No. 3396 John, Perkins.
10. Prison No. 946 John, Perkins- Died 3 Nov 1814.
11. Prison No. 4408 James, Perkins.
12. Prison No. 6408 Clem, Perkins.
13.Prison No. 6452 Thomas, Perkins.
14. Prison No. 3547 Samuel, Perkins.
15. Prison No. 3074 Samuel, Perkins.
16. Prison No. 1394 Edward Carter.
17. Prison No. 1395 Daniel Carter.
18. Prison No. 1312 Edward Carter.
19. Prison No. 1685 Jesse Carter.
20. Prison No. 1850 Thomas Carter .
21. Prison No. 4203 Henry Carter.
22. Prison No. 4213 Enoch Carter.
23. Prison No. 4880 George Carter.
24. Prison No. 1512 Edward Carter.
25. Prison No. 1413 William Goodwin.
26. Prison No. 5167 John Goodwin.
27. Prison No. 5896 Sam Goodwin.
28. Prison No. 1658 William Gore.
29. Prison No. 2976 Amos Gale.
30. Prison No. 4146 William Gale.
31. Prison No. 5463 Sam Gale.
32. Prison No. 6438 Russel Gale.
33. Prison No. 1317 Adam Stewart.
34. Prison No. 1421 William Stewart.
35. Prison No. 2131 James Stewart.
36. Prison No. 2643 John Stewart.
37. Prison No. 512 William Stewart.
38. Prison No. 1084 William Simons.
39. Prison No. 1288 John Simons.
40. Prison No. 1997 John Simons.

1 comment:

darlene cantey said...

Wonderful work! I have never seen this before and really appreciate it all. Thank you.