Monday, January 12, 2009

They Could Be Family? Revolutionary War

In the last couple months I have done a lot of pages on many different topics and, had little time for fun. Fun you say isn’t researching “Fun?”, Well of course it’s fun, but researching is like when I was making my wood working crafts to sell, you couldn’t just make thing you wanted just for fun, you had make many different kinds of things, big and small for if you didn’t have a variety of things to sell no one would come.

It’s the same with my web site or any other web site if you don’t keep a verity of subjects on it, people will stop coming. Now don’t get me wrong researching is fun and it was fun putting up all those pages but sometime it was like I was working for someone else, and that’s not fun. So I decided I would take a couple days and work on something I like just for fun.

This page will be a short one only 15, names, I wanted to see how far I could take the information on them. This names are from the Revolutionary War, and I believe them to be part of the same family? But even if it turns out that their not family, that’s ok someone some where are looking for them. I did a little looking before I picked these names and found there could be a lot of information on them. But like I said even though that they may not turn out to be family, there are people looking for them some where, and will find the information very helpful.

I will place a index at the beginning of the page in that way you can see who this page is about, and if you don’t see a ancestor here or the name your looking into you will have no need to go farther. Unless you went to just for ( FUN ), you never know you may find a name or place you been looking for but could not find before.

Index.

Connecticut.

1. Amos Barns.
2. Daniel Barns.
3. Harchwell Barns.

Vermont.

1. Elijah Bennett

Connecticut.

1. Samuel Bennett.

Note. I made a error on the two Bennett’s I found they are from two different States and could not be family?, but I will post their info just the same.

Connecticut.

1. Asa Bunce.
2. Isaiah Bunce.

Connecticut.

1. Arron Cook.
2. Jonah Cook.

Connecticut.

1. Burr Gilbert.

2. Ebenezer Gilbert.

Note. Once again I made a erorr these Gleason's can not be family but it will still make for some Interesting reading

Massachusets.

1. Thomas Gleason.

New Hampshire.

1. Windsor Gleason.

New Hampshire.

1. Abraham Kimball.
2. Thomas Kimball.
---------------------------

Note. This information come from the Library of Congress the department of Claims 1789-1809. Vol. 1.
---------------------------

Connecticut.

Amos Barns, was from Connecticut, county and town unknown, he enlisted on March 1, 1777, place unknown. He was a private of the Invalids Corps, of the 3rd, regiment. He was disabled because of a rupture in the abdomen of a dangerous nature. His pension was to be $3.33 and a third, he had a arrears of $100, dollars, he had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 2, 1792, he was discharged from the Corps in 1783.

Daniel Barns, was from Connecticut, Bristol, county of Hartford, he was commissioned on April 22, 1777, place unknown. He was a Captain of the 8th, Connecticut regiment, he was disabled on August 2, 1780, from a diseases contracted from extreme heat and fatigue at the battle of Monmouth. His pension would be 6.66 and two thirds, he had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 3, 1792. He had arrears of $100, dollars, he resigned on August 21, 1780.

Harchwell or Hartwell Barns, was from Connecticut, Farmington, county of Hartford. He enlister on March 1, 1777, place unknown. He was a private in the invalids Corps of the 3rd, Connecticut regiment. He became disabled by contracting a disorder while in the service, lost his hearing and a incurred disability. His pension would be $2.22, dollars. He had certificates with a starting date of Oct. 2, 1792, he had arrears of $100, dollars. He was discharged 1783.

Note. I looked for these three man on the Pension rolls of the Unithe States, but they could not be found.
---------------------------------

Vermont.

Elijah Bennett, is from Vermont, Orwell, county of Rutland, was a private in Colonel Israel Putman’s command, was disabled on June 17, 1775, by a wound in his right arm at the battle of Bunker’s Hill, while in the service of the United States: which wound renders it, in some measure useless. He pension would be $2.22 and a third, he had some certificates with a starting date of June 29, 1792, he had arrears of $50, dollars. In the remarks it states that there was no musters in that office.
-------------------------------------

Connecticut.

Samuel Bennett, was from Connecticut, Weston and Stratford, both of the county of Fairfield, Was a private and Fifer, was in Colonel P. Bradley’s command,was in the company commanded by Captain E. Able, was disabled on February 19, 1776, while on a British prison ship at New York, he lost some toes from each of his feet from being frozen. His pension would be $3.66 and two-thirds, he had some certificates with a starting date of May 2, 1792, he had arrears of $200, dollars. In the remark it was stated that, that office had no militia rolls.
----------------------------------------

Connecticut.

Asa Bunce, was from Connecticut, Hartford, county of Hartford, enlisted on April 27, 1777, place unknown, was a Corporal of the 3rd, Connecticut regiment, was disabled by a disease contracted by being overheated on the march of the day at the battle of Monmouth. His pension would be $6.33 and two-thirds, had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 3, 1792, he has arrears of $150, dollars, was discharged on April 27, 1781.

Isaiah Bunce, was from Connecticut, Washington, county of Litchfield, enlisted March 26, 1777, was a private in the 7th, Connecticut regiment, under the command of Colonel Swift’s, was disabled on April 27, 1777, at New Milford, by a wound he received in his leg which has occasioned an ulcer, and renders him incapable of performing his accustomed labors. His pension would be $4.45, dollars, he had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 4, 1792, has arrears of $100, dollars, was discharged on March31, 1780.

United States Pension rolls.

Isaiah Bunce, private, Allowance $45, dollars per year, Sums received $472.50, dollars, Service was the Revolutionary War, Placed on pension rolls date unknown, Commencement of pension was September 4, 1794, Died in 1804.

Isaiah was born about 1743, Caanan Township, Litchfield county Connecticut. Father was Jacob Bunce, Mother was Martha Bunce , Iasiah wife was Damaria Mack, had at lest one child Mary Bunce.

Connecticut.

Aaron Cook or Cooke, was from Connecticut, Granby, county of Hartford, was a private and under the Command of Colonel Ebenezer Learned and Colonel Shepherd, was disabled in 1776, at Roxbury, disabled was a large callous ulcer on his ankle of his left leg occasioned by a wound received, in the dark night, while on guard, by means of some timber. His pension would be $5, dollars per month, he had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 4, 1792, had arrears of $200, dollars. The remarks state there are no musters for the year of 1775 in this office.

United States Pension Rolls.

Note. Although this is the same name and county this my not be him? By the dates this is a pension for the war of 1812? Although by his age he could have been in both, this info needs more research.

Aaron Cook, allowance was $96, dollars a year and had received the sums of $526.66, dollars, his services was the Massachusetts Line, was placed on the pension roll, June 28, 1819, commencement of pension, April 24, 1818, Age 72, Remarks Died October 23, 1823.

Jonah Cook or Cooke, was from Connecticut, Watertown, county of Litchfield, was a private in the 5th, regiment under the command of Colonel Isaac Sherman, enlisted either July 5, 1781, or January 5, 1781, for 6 months, was disabled in August of 1781 at Peekskill New York, Accidentally fell on a cedar stump which broke the rim of his belly which produced a dangerous rupture. His pension would be $3.33 and a third, he had some certificates with a starting date of Oct. 4, 1792, had arrears of $150, dollars.

United State Pension Rolls.

Note. He was on the pension roll three times because of the increases in his pension on April 20, 1796, April 25, 1808 and April 25, 1816.

Jonah Cook or Cooke, private, allowances were $30, $60 and $96 dollars, sums received were $407.50, $483.35 and $898.65 dollars. His service was Sherman’s 5th, Connecticut regiment. The date he was placed on the roll is unknown, commencement of his pension was September 4, 1794, April 4, 1808 and April 24, 1816. He died on September 6, 1825.

Note. I believe this to be his family?, but may need some research?

Jonah Cook or Cooke, was born August 4, 1750 or 1751, at Waterbury, New Haven Ct.
Father was Ebenezer Cook or Cooke, Mother was Phebe Blakeslee, Married Sarah Sanford on August 3, 1775, at Plymouth Ct. Jonah Cook died on September 6, 1825.

Connecticut.

Note. I know this is the right man because the dates and his home town is the same, however we have two story here. Read carefully.

Burr Gilbert, was from Weston in the county of Fairfield, enlisted on April 12, 1777, for the war. On one page it’s stated that he was a Sergeant of the 1st, regiment, then on other page it’s stated that he was a Corporal in the Command of Colonel Butler’s in the company of Captain Eel’s. On one page it’s stated he was disabled on June 28, 1778, it’s stated that his constitution impaired from being overheated at the battle of Monmouth and wounded. It’s stated on other page he was disabled at Fort Mifflin, no date given. His disability; Wounded in his legs, arms and hands occasioned by a cannon ball being fired into a pile of Bricks several of which were forced against him. His pension would be $3.56, dollars, he had some certificates with a starting date of May 3, 1792, he had arrears of $150, dollars. In the remarks it’s stated he was on the muster in 1781.

Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1839-1840
WEDNESDAY, February 5, 1840.

A petition of Clarissa Turney, of the town of Monroe, in the county of Fairfield, State of Connecticut, widow of Burr Gilbert, a sergeant in the war of the Revolution, praying for a pension.
Added note. He could also have being married to a Clarissa Johnson, Burr Gilbert needs a lot more research.

Ebenezer Gilbert, was from Brooklyn, county of Windham, he enlisted on April 29, 1777, and went to the end of the war, was a private of the 1st, Connecticut regiment, was disable in 1780, by a rupture, his pension would be $1.66 and two thirds, had some certificates with a starting date of September 26, 1792, had arrears of $100, dollars.

United States Pension Rolls.

Note. The name is right and the county but the dates are a little late which places him in the War of 1812, but then he may have put in for his pension late? Or he was in the War of 1812 too. Ebenezer needs more research.

Ebenezer Gilbert, private, Allowance was $96, dollars a year, Sums received $1,517.93, dollars, Service Connecticut Line, Placed on the pension roll May 25, 1819, Commencement of pension May 13, 1818, His age was 77.

Massachusetts.

Thomas Gleason, was from Massachusetts, Woburn county of Middlesex, was a private in the Massachusetts militia, was disabled April 19, 1775; was one of the party which opposed the British troops at Lexington and Concord, lost one of his thumbs and his hand was badly injured, by the bursting of a gun. Pension commencement on May 17, 1792, which was $1.66 and two thirds he had arrear of $20.

New Hampshire.

Windsor Gleason, was from New Hampshire, Langdon, county of Sullivan, enlisted February 1, 1779, was a private in Colonel Cilley’s command in Captain Farwell company, was disabled at Newton; wounded in his right leg, in the Indian expedition under General Sullivan. Pension was one-fourth, was discharged in February 1780.

New Hampshire.

Abraham Kimball, was from Hopkinton county of Hillsborough, was a private in the command of Colonel Stickney’s militia in Captain Bailey’s company, Was disabled in August of 1777, wounded in the thigh at the battle of Bennington, pension commencement on May 28, 1792, pension was .83 and two thirds, had arrear $15, dollars
Note. In the end his pension would be one-half.

United States Pension Rolls.

Note. He will be on the pension roll three times because of increases.

Abraham Kimball, was a private in Colonel Stickney’s infantry, his allowance was $30, $48 and $96, dollars, the sums he received were $705.08, $405.17 and $122.80, was placed on pension roll on Jan. 22, 1795, commencement of pension was March 4, 1795, April 24, 1816 and Feb. 12, 1827. He died on May 12, 1828.

Abraham Kimball, was born April 18, 1742, Hopkinton, Merrimack, N. H.
Father was Aaron Kimball, Mother was Susanna Smith, Abraham married Phoebe Runnels about 1777, as stated he passed on May 12, 1828.

Thomas Kimball, was from Amherst, county of Hillsborough, was a private in Colonel Read command, enlisted on June 3, 1778 and stayed till the end of the war, was disable in 1799 at Chemong or Shomung; wounded in the arm by a musket ball in a altercation with some Indians. Commencement of his pension was on May21, 1792, his pension was $1.11, dollars or one-fifth, he had arrear of $15, dollars, was on the muster in 1783.

United States Pension Rolls
Invalid pensioners.


Note. I believe this is the same man, but needs more research.

Thomas Kimball, private in Wallack’s artillery, allowance was $12, dollars sums received $123.03, dollars, date placed on roll unknown, commencement of pension March 4, 1795. Died some time between 1795 and 1796.

1 comment:

Anthony > Selletti said...

I read your posts often and enjoy your slant on history. There is a matter of great importance that I wish to bring to your attention. Fort Mifflin in Philadelphia Pa is in danger of closing its gates forever.

http://www.examiner.com/x-2272-Philadelphia-Landmarks-Examiner~y2009m1d7-Fort-Mifflin-could-close-doors-forever

Read scroll down to Subscribe and add your email address. Send this email to all on you list that care about historic preservation, and ask them to do the same. Thanks for taking the time to read this. The more people who subscribe and pass this along, the more the word gets out.

Blessings,
Tony Selletti