Monday, June 08, 2009

They Were Soldiers.

This page will be bits and pieces of information of the soldier. It will be about their services and some information on their families. Some of these names may be repeats from other pages, but the information will be new to you new comers to this site, and for you old times to this site, you may see something new or something you missed the first time.

George Ludlum.

George Ludlum enlisted as a private in Captain Van Buren’s company of the 29th regiment United States infantry, on February 10, 1814, for the period of during the war, and that he is entered on the inspection returns of said Van Buren’s company as having deserted, on April 28, 1815. It a1so appears from the certificate of Lieutenant Burr, of said regiment, bearing date June 13, 1815, that said Ludlum was absent, without leave, at the time the troops were paid off and discharged, but that he returned to Plattsburg a short time afterwards. It also appears that said Ludlum died some time after the close of the war, leaving a widow and several child.

Side note. Camp PLATTSBURG, March 20, 1815.

George Ludlum of the 29th regiment, Captain Van Buren’s company, has permission to pass and repass the guards from the date hereof until further orders, being on duty regulated by me.
S. .B URR, Lieutenant 29th Infantry Commanding Company.
ROCHESTER, Captain 29th Company.
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John Gwynn.

John Gwynn was a soldier in the revolutionary war, attached to the fourth regiment Maryland line, commanded by Colonel Carvill Hall; that he died in Baltimore, in the State of Maryland, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred; and at the time of his decease he was entitled to one hundred acres of bounty land for services in said revolutionary war; and that Julia Gwynn is the widow, and Catharine Gwynn and Susannah Gwynn are the surviving children and legitimate heirs of said John, deceased, and as heirs petition for said bounty land.

It is in evidence, by letters from the War Department, that on the 14th day of July, 1795, being more than five years previous to the decease of said John Gwynn, a land warrant, No. 11262, was issued to William Marbury, the assignee of one David Lawler, administrator on the estate of the same John Gwynn. In consequence of the warrant issued as aforesaid, the War Department now declines issuing another warrant to the legitimate heirs, who have thus been defrauded out of their land.

It is manifest that a base fraud has been perpetrated, and the government imposed upon by said pretended administrator, or other interested person; but in justice to the character of said William Marbury, the assignee as aforesaid, the committee are induced to acquit him of all knowledge of the fraudulent design and transaction. A patent has been granted upon the aforesaid warrant; the title to the land has been transferred by said assignee, but in whom it is now vested the committee are not informed. There is no evidence, however, to induce a belief that the said John Gwynn, in his lifetime, or the widow and heirs since his decease, were ever concerned in said fraud, or that they have in the least participated in it.
The committee are of opinion that the heirs of said John Gwynn are entitled to relief, and report a bill.
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Leonard Holly.

Leonard Holly enlisted as a soldier for five years, on June 22, 1812, in the 10th regiment of United States infantry, and was continued on the rolls of his regiment until April, 1815, after which no further notice of him was taken upon the muster or payrolls. From this statement, it satisfactorily appears that Leonard Holly served in the army of the United States during the whole of the late war, and that he would be entitled to his military bounty land, and any pay which might be due to him, were he alive, unless he had deserted, or been deprived of any part of his right by the sentence of a court-martial, of which no evidence exists; but as it appears that he has never been heard of, either by his family or by any person, since April, 1815, the presumption obviously arises that he is dead. The committee, therefore, report a bill for the relief of his legal representatives, the War Department not considering itself authorized to settle with them unless it be furnished with positive proof of the death of the individual through whom they derive their claim.
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John Van Pelt.

When John Van Pelt, a Revolutionary soldier died, his wife Sarah Van Pelt asked for his pension which she got, then on May29, 1854, Sarah died leaving children behind. They would ask for and receive her pension which was $31.75 per annum.
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Benjamin Gannett and Deborah Gannett.

A BILL
DECEMBER 22, 1837.
For the relief of Benjamin Gannett, widower of Deborah Gannett a soldier of the Revolution.

Be it enacted by the Senate anti House of Representatives of the United States of America in congress assembled, That the Secretary of War place the name of Benjamin Gannett,
widower of Deborah Gannett, a soldier of the Revolution., late of’ Sharon. State of Massachusetts, now deceased, on the roll of revolutionary pensioners; and that he cause to be paid to the said Gannett the sum of eighty dollars per annum, commencing on the fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and thirty one, for and during his natural life.
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Deborah Gannett alias, Robert Shurtlieff.

Deborah Gannett, of the town of Sharon, in the State of Massachusetts, was presented to the House and read, stating that the petitioner, though a female, enlisted as a continental soldier, for the term of three years, in the Massachusetts line, of the late American army, by the name of Robert Shurtlieff; that she faithfully performed the duties of a soldier during the time above specified, and received a wound while in the actual service of the United States, in consequence of which she is subjected to pain and infirmities; and praying that she may receive the pay and emoluments granted to other wounded and disabled soldiers.
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Benjamin Berry.

Benjamin Berry, was a Revolutionary soldier. In 1856, was living in the State of Maine, he was placed on the pension roll, 1856, he would receive $96, per annum commencing on January 1, 1850.
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Francis Weeks.

When Francis Weeks, a soldier of the war of 1812, of the State of Georgia, died his wife Nancy Weeks, received his pension, then on January 20, 1868, Congress passed a Bill which would increase her pension to ten dollars per month.
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Benjamin Berry.

Benjamin Berry, was a Revolutionary soldier. In 1856, was living in the State of Maine, he was placed on the pension roll, 1856, he would receive $96, per annum commencing on January 1, 1850.
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Francis Weeks.

When Francis Weeks, a soldier of the war of 1812, of the State of Georgia, died his wife Nancy Weeks, received his pension, then on January 20, 1868, Congress passed a Bill which would increase her pension to ten dollars per month.
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Samuel Allen.

A. BILL
March 30, 1840.

Granting a pension to Pamela Allen, widow of the late Samuel Allen, a soldier of the Revolution.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assemb1ed That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized and required to place the name of Pamela Allen, of Jericho, in the county of Chittenden, and State of Vermont, on the list of pensioners of the United States, and pay her the sum of twenty dollars per annum during her natural life; commencing on the fourth day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-one.
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Samuel B. Porter.

Samuel B. Porter. was a soldier of the war of 1812, and received a pension of $6, dollars per month, He was hoping for more as he was totally disabled from a wound he received at the battle of Plattsburg, but he had no proof. It was stared that if and when he could show proof of his disability, he would receive $8, dollars per month, starting from the day of proof.
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Anthony Casio alias Anthony Castle.

A BILL
APRIL 13, 1858.
For the relief of Anthony Casio, a soldier of the war of eighteen hundred and twelve.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, directed to allow and pay to Anthony Casio, otherwise known as Anthony Castle, an invalid pensioner, an amount equal to two dollars and sixty-six cents per month, from the twenty-fifth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, to the twenty-fifth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, the date at which his name was entered on the roll of invalid pensioners.
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John Brest.

John Brest, of Bourbon county, State of Kentucky, a soldier of the war of 1812, had been receiving $6, dollars per month but now receiving $8, dollars per month, in 1858.
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Amendments, to the RULES and REGULATIONS of the continental Army.

3. All non-commissioned Officers and soldiers, convicted before a regimental court-martial of stealing, embezzling or destroying ammunition, provisions, tools or any thing belonging to the public stores, if a non-commissioned officer, to be reduced to the ranks, and punished with whipping, not less than fifteen, nor more than thirty-nine lashes, at the discretion of the court-martial; if a private soldier with the same corporal punishment.

4. In all cases where a commissioned officer is cashiered for cowardice or fraud, it be added in the punishment, that the crime, name, place of abode, and punishment of the delinquent be published in the news papers, in and about the camp, and of that colony from which the offender came, or usually resides: after which it shall be deemed scandalous in any officer to associate with him.

5. Any officer or solider, who shall begin, excite, cause, or join in any mutiny or sedition in the regiment, troop, or company to which he belongs, or in any other regiment, troop, or company of the continental forces, either by land or sea, or in any party, post, detachment or guard, on any pretence whatsoever, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as a general court-martial shall direct.

6. Any officer or soldier, who shall desert to the enemy, and afterwards be taken, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as a general court-martial shall direct.

7. Whatsoever commissioned officer shall be found drunk on his guard, party, or other duty under arms, shall be cashiered and drummed out of the army with infamy; any non-commissioned officer or soldier so offending, shall be sentenced to be whipped, not less than twenty, nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence.

8. Whatsoever officer or soldier, placed as centinel, shall be found sleeping upon his post, or shall leave it before he shall he regularly relieved, if a commissioned officer, shall be cashiered, and drummed out of the army with infamy; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, shall be sentenced to be whipped, not less than twenty, nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence:

9. No officer or soldier shall lie out of his quarters or camp, without leave from the commanding officer of the regiment, upon penalty, if an officer, of being mulcted one month's pay for the first offence, and cashiered for the second; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, of being confined seven days on bread and water for the first offence; and the same punishment and a forfeiture of a week's pay for the second.

10. Whatsoever officer or soldier shall misbehave himself before the enemy, or shamefully abandon any post committed to his charge, or shall speak words inducing others to do the like, shall suffer death.

11. All public stores taken in the enemy's camp or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing, or provisions, shall be secured for the use of the United Colonies: and all commissioned officers, found guilty, by a general court-martial, of embezzling the same, or any of them, shall forfeit all his pay, be ipso facto cashiered, and deemed unfit for farther service as an officer. And all non-commissioned officers and soldiers, convicted before a regimental court-martial of stealing or embezzling the same, if a non-commissioned officer, shall be reduced to the ranks, and punished with whipping, not less than fifteen, nor more than thirty-nine, lashes, at the discretion of the court-martial; if a private soldier, with the same punishment.

12. If any officer or soldier, shall leave his post or colours, in time of an engagement, to go in search of plunder, he shall, if a commissioned officer, be cashiered, and drummed out of the army with infamy, and forfeit all share of plunder; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, be whipped, not less than twenty, nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence, and forfeit all share of the plunder taken from the enemy.

13. Every officer commanding a regiment, troop, or company, shall, upon notice given to him by the commissary of the musters, or from one of his deputies, assemble the regiment, troop, or company under his command, in the next convenient place for their being mustered, on penalty of his being cashiered, and mulcted of his pay.

14. At every muster, the commanding officer of each regiment, troop or company there present, shall give to the Commissary of Musters, certificates signed by himself, signifying how long such officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers, who shall not appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their absence, which reasons and the time of absence, shall be inserted in the muster rolls, opposite the names of such absentees: and the surgeons or their mates, shall at the same time give to the Commissary of musters a certificate signed by them, signifying the state of health or sickness of those under their care, and the said certificate shall, together with the muster rolls, be by the said commissary transmitted to the general, and to this or any future Congress of the United Colonies, or committee appointed thereby, within twenty days next after such muster being taken, on failure whereof, the Commissary so offending, shall be discharged from the service.

15. Every officer who shall be convicted before a general court-martial, of having signed a false certificate relating to the absence of either officer, non-commissioned officer, or private soldier; and every surgeon or mate, convicted of signing a false certificate, relating to the health or sickness of those under his care, shall be cashiered.

16. All officers and soldiers who shall wilfully, or through negligence, disobey any general or special orders, shall be punished at the discretion of a regimental court-martial, where the offence is against a regimental order, and at the discretion of a general court-martial, where the offence is against an order given from the commander in chief, or the commanding officer of any detachment or post, and such general court-martial can be had.
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Thomas Eden.

Thomas Eden was a marine on board of the United States schooner Ann Alossis, commanded by James Smith, in the war of 1812, he was taken prisoner by the enemy and was imprisoned twelve months in the prison-ship La Amathist, at Jamaica, in 1813. When he was released he served as a soldier in said war, in the company of Captain William A. Dunham, regiment commanded by Colonel James Johnston, and was honorably discharged when peace was proclaimed, for his service he would receive a pension of eight dollars per month, for life, to commence on February 1, 1868.
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John Gray.

John Gray, was a revolutionary soldier and is from Noble county, Ohio. He asked for and got a pension of five hundred dollars per annum for life, payable semi-annually, commencing on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-six.
Passed the House of Representatives January 25, 1867.
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Daniel Frederick Bakernan.

Daniel Frederick Bakernan, was a revolutionary soldier and is from Sandusky, New York, He asked for and got a pension of five hundred dollars per annum for life, payable semi-annually, commencing on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-six.
Passed the House of Representatives January 25, 1867.
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John Gilbert.

John Gilbert, was a revolutionary soldier and was in Colonel W. B. Whiting’s regiment. John Gilbert would die on the twelfth day of April, eighteen hundred and fifty-two, leaving his children with a pension of that of a private, from the seventh of June, eighteen hundred and thirty-two, to the time of his death.
Passed the House of Representatives, January 9, 1857.
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Josiah Wilson.

Josiah Wilson, a soldier of the war of 1812, is from Salem, Washington County, State of New York, and served in Captain Daniel St. John’s company, New York militia. He would ask and receive a pension of eight dollars per month commencing on February, 14, 1871.
Passed the House of Representatives January 30, 1873.
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William Adams.

William Adams, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was a citizen of Franklinville, New York, he served in the thirty—ninth regiment New York infantry. He would ask and receive a pension of eight dollars per month commencing on January 1, 1869, and ending upon his death.
Passed the House of Representatives January 20, 1869.
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George Givens.

George Givens, was a soldier of the war of 1812, is now a citizen of Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, State of Pennsylvania, he served in the twenty-fourth U. S. infantry, He would ask and receive a pension of eight dollars per month commencing on December 1, 1868, and ending upon his death.
Passed the House of Representatives January 20, 1869.
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Warren Raymond.

Warren Raymond, was a soldier of the war of 1812, was a private in the One Hundred and thirty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers Infantry, he would ask and received a pension of four dollars per month, but asked for a increase which he received and would commence on the fourth day of September, 1870, and ending upon his death.
Passed the House of Representatives January 26, 1872.
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John A. Parker.

John A. Parker, was a soldier of the great rebellion, was a private in company K., fifth regiment of Kansas cavalry volunteers. He would have his left arm shattered in battle, and a amputation was necessary. He was to receive a pension of fifteen dollars per month, commencing on January 1, 1865.
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Joseph L. Clark and Sally Clark, and Newbery Morse.

Joseph L. Clark, was a solider of the war of 1812, was a private in Captain Page’s company, of Colonel Sherwin’s regiment of Massachusetts militia. Joseph was a substitute for Newbery Morse, Joseph who is now deceased. Sally Clark his wife would ask and received a pension of eight dollars per month and is to commence on February 14, 1871, Sally would also receive a land-warrant for the military services of her deceased husband.
Passed the House of Representatives January 30, 1873.
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Daniel Hauser.

Daniel Hauser, was a soldier of the war of 1812, now a citizen of Forsyth county, North Carolina. Daniel served in the fifth regiment of the North Carolina militia. He would received a pension of eight dollars per month and is to commence on January 1, 1869, ending at the time of his death.
Passed the House of Representatives January 20, 1869.
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A. W. W. Bayard and Susan Bayard.

A. W. W. Bayard, was a soldier of the war of 1812, who is of Centre county, Pennsylvania, and is now deceased. Susan his wife is to continued receiving his pension.
Passed the House of Representatives February 9, 1861.
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Asbury E. Anderson.

A bill of FEBRUARY 26, 1872, for Asbury E. Anderson, who was a private in Company H, of the Fifty-seventh Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, in the war for the suppression of the rebellion, the sum of________ dollars, in full compensation for four months’ service as such private soldier, for which he has not been heretofore paid.
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William Laughlin and Agnes W. Laughlin.

William Laughlin, was a private in company C third Indiana cavalry, and is now deceased, his wife Agnes W. Laughlin, is now to receive his pension commencing January 1, 1865.
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Pollard Brown.

Pollard Brown, of Abbeville, South Carolina, a soldier of the Revolution, a warrant for military bounty land, for one hundred and sixty acres, to be located upon any public lands of the United States that have been surveyed, and are now or may be in market.
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Daniel Biggs.

Daniel Biggs, of Indiana, was a solider of the war of 1812, is now in his seventy-five year of life to be placed on the pension roll at the rate of eight dollars per month, to commence on January 1, 1870, and ending upon his death.
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Samuel Allen and Pamela Allen.

Samuel Allen was a soldier of the Revolution, and now deceased. Pamela Allen, his wife of Jericho, in the county of Chittenden, and State of Vermont, to receive the sum of twenty dollars per month commencing on March 4, 1831, and ending upon her death.
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Simeon Webster.

Simeon Webster, a Soldier of the Revolution., of Tolland, in the county of Tolland, in the State of Connecticut, to be restored to the pension roll at, eight dollars per month.
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Samuel Patton.

Samuel Patton, a revolutionary soldier, is of the county of Hardin, and State of Kentucky, to receive a pension of eight dollars per month commencing January 1, 1831.
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James Phelps.

James Phelps, a revolutionary soldier, was of the county of Cortland, in the State of New York, who died on November 23, 1842, To his children or legal representatives, a pension of a private, eight dollars a month, pay commencing on March 4, 1831, and ending on the date of James Phelps death.
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Peter Hubert and Maria J. Hubert.

Peter Hubert, a revolutionary soldier, was in General Hazen’s regiment. Now deceased, to his wife Maria J. Hubert, and his children; Pierre Picard, Pierre Hubert, Fran├žois Hubert, and Jean B. Hubert. The pay of a private, under the act of Congress of May fifteen, eighteen hundred and twenty-eight, from the time said act commenced until his death, on the ninth day of April, eighteen hundred and fifty-three.
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Simeon Griggs and Letty Griggs.

Simeon Griggs, a revolutionary soldier of Vermont, now deceased. His wife Letty Griggs is now entitled to receive his pension, at the rate of six dollars per month during her life, commencing on the fourth day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-six, and that the sum required to carry into effect the provisions of this act is hereby appropriated.
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Duran T. Hunt.
April 1, 1872.


Duran T. Hunt, of Clarinda, Page County, Iowa, late a soldier in Company A, Fourth Regiment Veteran Volunteer Cavalry, be placed on the pension-rolls, subject to the rules and regulations of the Pension Bureau; his compensation to commence from the date of his discharge.
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James Kip and John L. Kip.

James Kip, a revolutionary soldier, who is now deceased, to his son John L. Kip, the sum of a full pension, to which the said James Kip was entitled, under the act of June seventh, eighteen hundred and thirty-two, from March fourth, eighteen hundred and thirty-one, to November nineteenth, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, the time of his decease.
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Henry Waithall and Elizabeth Waithall.


Henry Waithall was a revolutionary soldier, who is now deceased, to his wife Elizabeth Waithall, a pension, at the rate of eight dollars a month, from the time of his ceased, to continue during her life, deducting there from the pension she has received by any former law; and that he issue a land warrant to her for one hundred and sixty acres, without any other proof.
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Amos Oney.

Amos Oney was a revolutionary soldier, who is now deceased, to his surviving children, the pension due to their father under the act of June seven, eigh6 teen hundred and thirty-two, from the fourth day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-one, till his death, which occurred on the twelfth day of December, eighteen hundred and forty-six, at the rate of six dollars a month, out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.
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Alexander Stevenson.

Alexander Stevenson, a soldier of the revolutionary war, who is now deceased. To pay to the legal representatives of Alexander Stevenson, a soldier of the Revolution, for the use of his heirs, (the said Stevenson having served as a private in the sixth regiment Pennsylvania line, from about the first of January, seventeen hundred and seventy-six, till first August, seventeen hundred and eighty-three, and having been in the battle of Three Rivers, Lower Canada,) a sum equal to the amount due a private between said periods, with interest from December, eighteen hundred and thirty seven, the period when a demand for payment was made upon the government therefore one month’s pay to be deducted, said amount having been paid to said soldier in his life-time; which said sum shall be in full of all claims for unpaid money due to said Stevenson and his heirs for services rendered in the revolutionary war.
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James Curry and Ellen Curry.

Ellen Curry, widow of James Curry, deceased, private soldier in company F, thirty-
ninth regiment Illinois infantry volunteers, upon the pension roll of the United States, subject to the laws now in force in relation to pensions.
Passed the House of Representatives June 12, 1868.
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John Sawyer.

John Sawyer, of Garland, in the county of Penobscot, in the State of Maine, on the roll of revolutionary pensioners, and pay him a pension, at the rate of twenty-four dollars a year, during his natural life, commencing on the fourth day of March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirtyone.
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Eli Smith.

Eli Smith, a revolutionary soldier, of the town of Medfield, in the State of Massachusetts, on the pension roll, at eight dollars per month, to commence on the first day of January, eighteen hundred and twenty-eight.
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Fortune Stoddard Kills James Cunningham.

War Office, August 10th., 1782.

On the 22nd. of December last a soldier of the Rhode Island Regiment killed one James Cunningham, for which act he has been tried by the laws of the State of Maryland and acquitted of murder; but found guilty of manslaughter, and is now detained in jail for costs, which amount to about 24 pounds, which sum must be discharged by the public or he will be sold to refund the expense. This I am convinced would be a real injury to the service; besides it will cost much more than that sum to procure a man in his stead to serve during the war--

I beg leave therefore to submit to the consideration of Congress the propriety of passing the following resolve.

Whereas Fortune Stoddard a soldier in the army of the United States has been tried and punished by the civil authority of the State of Maryland for an offence against the laws of that State and is now kept in custody for the fees,

Resolved, That the Executive of the State of Maryland be requested to discharge the said Fortune Stoddard from his confinement and charge the United States with the fees, and that the amount of the said fees be charged by the United States to the State of Rhode Island.

Resolved, That the executive authority of the State of Maryland be requested to discharge from confinement Fortune Stoddard, a soldier belonging to the Rhode Island regiment, confined for costs accrued in a late prosecution, and charge such costs to the United States, transmitting to the Secretary at War the account thereof, in order that the same may be charged to the said soldier, and deducted out of his pay.
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George Lynch.

George Lynch, a soldier of the war of eighteen hundred and twelve, a pension at the rate of twenty dollars per month, in lieu of the pension of eight dollars per month now received by him, to commence from and after the passage of this act, and to continue during his natural life.
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Pensioners.

1. William Blake, solider of the war of 1812, was getting a pension of eight dollars, now to receive twenty a month.

2. George Lynch, solider of the war of 1812, was getting a pension of eight dollars, now to receive twenty a month.

3. Richard J. Murray, a soldier in the Seminole war of eighteen hundred and eighteen.
A pension of eight dollars per month, to commence on the first day of December, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, and to continue during his natural life.

4. Henry Miller, a soldier of the war of 1812, a pension of eight dollars per month, commencing on the fourteenth day of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven.

5. John Farrow, a soldier of the revolution, a pension of eight dollars per month, commencing on first day of January, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and thirty.

6. John Bradshaw, a soldier of the revolution, a pension of eight dollars per month, commencing on the fourth of September, one thousand eight hundred and
thirty one.

7. John W. Salyers, of the State of Indiana, a soldier of the war of eighteen hundred and
twelve, on the pension roll, at the rate of eight dollars per month, to commence from the passage of this act, and to continue during his natural life.

8. John Eaton, is to have remove the charge of desertion, or absence without leave, from John Eaton, a private in Company K, Eighteenth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and entitle him to an honorable discharge.

9. Joseph Bailey, an invalid soldier of the war of eighteen hundred and twelve. A pension of eight dollars per month, from the first day of December, eighteen hundred and fifty-five.

10. John Cullins, a soldier of the revolutionary war, of the State of Ohio, on the invalid pension roll, at the rate of eight dollars per month, to commence on the first day of January, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, and to continue during his, said Cullins’s natural,
life.
11. Charles Brown a soldier of the Revolutionary war, upon the Pension list, at the ratio of eight dollars per month, to continue during his natural life; and to commence on the first day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty.

12. William Lynch, a soldier of the war of 1812, on the roll of invalid pensioners at the
rate of eight dollars per month, commencing on the eighth day of July, eighteen hundred and forty-eight, to continue during his natural life.

13. Ezra Rogers, a soldier of the war of Indiana., placed on the pension roll, at the rate of eight dollars a month, to commence from the passage of this act and to continue during his natural life.

14. Mary Towson, widow of Joshua Towson, a soldier of the war of 1812, to issue to Mary Towson, widow of Joshua Towson, a warrant for one hundred and sixty acres of bounty land, in recompense of her husband’s services in the war of eighteen hundred and twelve.
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Isaac Staples and Abram Staples.

Isaac Staples, a revolutionary soldier. A warrant to be .granted and issued to Abram Staples, heir-at-law of Isaac Staples, a revolutionary soldier, for one hundred and sixty
acres of land, in the place and upon the return of one issued to Esther Staples, bearing date September twenty-fourth, eighteen hundred and fifty-five.
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Elijah Dailey.

Elijah Dailey, an invalid soldier of the war of eighteen hundred and twelve. The sum of six hundred and fifty dollars, that being the amount due him to make his pay the full pay of a private from the twentieth of November, eighteen hundred and fourteen, the commencement of his disability, to the first of February, eighteen hundred and fifty-six, the date of his certificate, increasing his pension to full pay.
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Cornelius Summers and Elizabeth Summers.

Cornelius Summers, a soldier of the war of 1812, who is now deceased, to Elizabeth Summers, his wife, a land warrant for one hundred and sixty acres of land, as provided by the act of September twenty-eight, eighteen hundred and fifty, for nine months’ service in said war: Provided, That if any land warrant has been heretofore issued for the services of her said husband, the number of acres thereby granted shall be deducted from the number of acres herein allowed to her.
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Archibald Parker.

Archibald Parker, a soldier of the war of 1812, To his heris, a warrant for bounty land due on account of the services of Archibald Parker, deceased, who was a soldier of the thirty-
eighth regiment of infantry in the late war with Great Britain; which warrant may be issued in the name of the heirs of the said Archibald Parker, and be converted by them into land scrip, according to the laws heretofore made and provided for that purpose.
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James Saxton.

James Saxton, a soldier of the revolution, now or late of Walker county, in the State of Georgia, a soldier of the war of the revolution, be, and he is hereby, directed to be placed on the pension list of the United States under the provisions of the first section of the act of the seventh of June, one thousand eight hundred and thirty8 two, entitled “An act supplementary to an act for the relief of certain surviving officers and soldiers of the revolution,” and that he be entitled to all the pension granted and benefits conferred by said act for service as such soldier in the army of the United States for and during the term of eighteen months.
SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That in case the said James Saxton shall have deceased, then such sum or pension money as by the provisions of the act aforesaid was or would have been due to the said James Saxton, at and immediately before his decease, as a pensioner as aforesaid, for eighteen months’ service, as a soldier as aforesaid, shall be paid to the widow of said James Saxton, if living, and if deceased, to his surviving lawful child or children, if any he bath; and the same shall be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.
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John Van Pelt and Sarah Van Pelt.

John Van Pelt and Sarah Van Pelt now deceased, to the surviving children of John Van Pelt and Sarah Van Pelt the pension due to her, from the fourth day of July, eighteen hundred and thirty-six, to her death, which occurred on the twenty-ninth day of May, eighteen hundred and fifty four, at the rate of thirty-one dollars and seventy-five cents
per annum, out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.
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Samuel Elliott and Martha Elliott.

Samuel Elliott a soldier of the war of 1812, now deceased, to place the name of Martha Elliott, widow of Samuel Elliott, upon the pension roll, at the rate of eight dollars per month, beginning on the first day of January last, and to continue during the course of her natural life.
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Baylor Byrd and Nancy Byrd.

Baylor Byrd, a revolutionary soldier, now deceased, to place the name of Nancy Byrd, of Williamson county, Tennessee, on the pension roll, and that she be paid, out of any money not otherwise appropriated, at the rate of eighty dollars per an7 num, for five years, commencing on the fourth day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-six.
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Patrick Meehon.

Patrick Meehon a soldier of the war of 1812, a pension at the rate of eight dollars per month, be, and the same is hereby, increased to thirty dollars pea’ month, said increase to be paid from the seventeenth February, eighteen hundred and seventy-one, the said Meehon being now over one hundred years of age, without any means of support, nearly blind, and physically helpless.
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Robert Purchase.

Robert Purchase, a soldier of the war of 1812, of Ontario county, State of New York, on the roll of revolutionary pensioners of the United States, and pay to him the sum of eighty dollars per annum, to be computed from the fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and thirty one, and to continue during his natural life; and if dead, to his widow.
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Ransom Clark.

Ransom Clark, a pension of four dollars per month, in addition to that which he now receives, to commence on the day of his discharge from the army, and to be paid out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to continue during his natural life.
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John W. Saylers.

John W. Saylers, soldier of the war of 1812, of Indiana, placed on he pension roll, at the rate of eight dollars per month, to commence on February ten, eighteen hundred and sixty-eight, and to continue during his natural life.
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Frank Pugsley.

Frank Pugsley, as a private soldier in Company I, of the Third regiment of New Hampshire volunteers, the accounting officers of the treasury are authorized and required to regard the date of his discharge from the service of the United States as of the twenty-fourth day of October, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and to compute his pay and allowances as such soldier to that time.

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