Monday, October 12, 2009

Battle At Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation, 1861.

There will be seven reports on this Battle, you will find many surnames in these reports.

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No. 10. Report of Colonel James McIntosh, Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles, commanding division,of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation, with letters found in Hopoeithleyohola's camp.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, Van Buren, Ark., January 1, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the battle of Chustenahlah, which took place in the Cherokee Nation on the 26th of December, 1861:

Before entering upon the details of the battle it is necessary for me to state that I entered the Cherokee Nation with a portion of my division upon the representation of Colonel Cooper, commanding the Indian Department, calling upon me for additional force. This call was based upon the hostile stand taken by the Creek chief Hopoeithleyohola and the dissatisfaction which has sprung up in one of the Cherokee regiments. I hastened to Fort Gibon, with 1,600 men, and had an interview with Colonel Cooper, and entered into arrangements for mutual co-operation. The plan proposed was that Colonel Cooper, with his force strengthened by Major Whitfield's battalion, should move up the Arkansas River and endeavor to get in the rear of Hopoeithleyohola's position on one of the tributaries of the Verdigris River,near the Big Bend of the Arkansas, while my force should march up the Verdigris River opposite the position held by the enemy,and then move directly upon him. On account of the scarcity of forage it was mutually determined that either force should attack the enemy on sight.

I left Fort Gibson at 12 m. on the 22nd ultimo with the following force: Five companies of the South Kansas-Texas Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Lane; the available strength of the Sixth Regiment of Texas Cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Griffith; seven companies of the Third [Eleventh] Regiment of Texas Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Young; four companies of my own regiment, Second Arkansas Mounted Riflemen, under Captain Gipson; and Captain Bennett's company of Texans attached to the headquarters of the division. This force amounted to 1,380 men.

On the evening of the 25th ultimo a part of the enemy's force appeared in sight immediately after our arrival in camp. A regiment was sent to observe them. I soon satisfied that this party was endeavoring to lead us on a fruitless chase. I therefore restrained my impatient men and ordered them back to camp. During the evening an express reached me from Colonel Cooper, with the intelligence that it would probably be two or three days before he could make the preconcerted movement, on account of the desertion of his teamsters, and generously stated that if I found it necessary to advance he would give me all the assistance in his power. From this point, knowing it was impossible to move my train farther, I ordered it to remain in charge of Captain Elstner, acting brigade quartermaster, with a guard of 100 men.

With four days' cooked rations I left camp early on the morning of the 26th, and moved cautiously toward the stronghold of the enemy among the mountains running, back into the Big Bend of the Arkansas. Lieutenant-Colonel Lane, with his regiment, moved in advance. A company of his regiment, under Captain Short, was thrown forward as an advance guard, with orders to throw out flankers well to the right and left. Toward 12 m. we approached Shoal Creek, a tributary of the Verdigris.

As soon as Captain Short had crossed the stream a heavy and continuous firing was opened upon him. The company gallantly maintained its position. I immediately ordered Lieutenant Griffith, with his regiment, to move up on the right, and Colonel Young on the left. The center, composed of Lieutenant-Colonel Lane's regiment, Captain Bennett's company, and the detachment of the Second Regiment of Arkansas Mounted Riflemen, then moved forward and crossed the stream in the face of the enemy in large numbers posted to the right on a high and rugged hill, with its side covered with oak trees.

The enemy continued their fire upon us. Colonel Young promptly crossed the stream and formed upon the left of the center, which was already in line of battle. Lieutenant-Colonel Griffith, with his regiment, was ordered to march up the stream, which flowed at the base of the hill on which the enemy was posted, and, after moving opposite their left flank to dismount, cross the stream, and attack him in the flank. All these orders were promptly and efficiently executed, and the whole force ready for action. The enemy was in a very strong position, and from it observed our actions, in happy innocence of the gallant resolve which animated the hearts of those in the valley below them. The Seminoles, under the celebrated chief Halek Tustenuggee, were in front on foot, posted behind the trees and rocks, while others were in line near the summit of the hill.

Hopoeithleyohola's Creeks were beyond, on horseback. A few representatives of other tribes were also in the battle. The whole force was estimated at 1,700. Between the rough and rugged side of the hill a space of 200 or 300 yards intervened of open ground. Each tree on the hill-side screened a stalwart warrior. It seemed a desperate undertaking to charge a position which appeared almost inaccessible, but the order to charge to the top of the hill met a responsive feeling from each gallant heart in the line, and at 12 m. the charge was sounded, one wild yell from a thousand throats burst upon the air, and the living mass hurled itself upon the foe.

The sharp report of the rifle came from every three and rock, but on our brave men rushed, nor stopped until the summit of the hill was gained and we were mingled with the enemy. The South Kansas-Texas regiment, led by those gallant officers Colonel Lane and Major Chilton, breasted itself for the highest point of the hill, and rushed over its rugged side with the irresistible force of tornado, and swept everything before it. The brave Major Chilton, while approaching the summit of the hill, received a severe wound in the head, but with unabated vigor continued in the fight. Captain Bennett, with his company and the detachment of the Second Regiment Arkansas Mounted Riflemen, under Captain Gipson, gallantly charged side by side. Captain Gipson was ordered to dismount his command and move into a thicket into which he had driven a portion of the enemy, which he did promptly and with great execution.

After charging some distance on the extreme left, the gallant Colonel Young, observing that the enemy were moving to the more rugged part of the field of battle on the right, with ready foresight rapidly moved his regiment to that portion of the field, an succeeded in cutting off many of the enemy. Lieutenant-Colonel Griffith, having obeyed the first order given him, observing the enemy flying from the hill, rapidly mounted his command, and moved forward up the stream, crossed it some distance above, and gallantly encountered the enemy,who had made a stand near their principal encampment.

The enemy by this time were much scattered and had retreated to the rocky gorges amid the deep recesses of the mountain, where they were pursued by our victorious troops and routed in every instance with great loss. They endeavored to make a stand at their encampment, but their efforts were ineffectual, and we were soon the midst of it. Property of every description was scattered around. The battle lasted until 4 o'clock, when the firing gradually ceased, and we remained victors in the center of Hopoeithleyohola's camp.

The loss sustained by the enemy was very severe. Their killed amounted to upwards of 250. Our loss was 8 killed and 32 wounded. The brave and gallant Lieutenant Fitzhue was shot in the head, and fell while gallantly leading his company. Captain J. D.young, of Young's regiment, and Lieutenant Durham, of the South Kansas-Texas Regiment, were both wounded while in the thick of the battle. We captured 160 women and children, 20 negroes, 30 wagons, 70 yoke of oxen, about 500 Indian horses, several hundred head of cattle, 100 sheep, and a great quantity of property of much value to the enemy. The stronghold of Hopoeithleyohola was completely broken up, and his force scattered in every direction, destitute of the simplest elements of subsistence.

At 4 o'clock the rally was sounded, and the different commands went into camp on the battle-field. The dead and wounded were collected and cared for. The officers of the medical department of the different regiments deserve much credit for their promptness in attending to the wounded.

A party of Stand Waties' regiment of Cherokees, numbering 300, under the command of the colonel, although under my orders, came up just as the battle terminated. This regiment had been ordered to join me from its station on Grand River. It was no fault of its commander that it did not reach us sooner. Every effort on his part was made in order to reach us in time.

At early dawn on the day after the battle I again left camp in pursuit of the flying enemy. After a hot pursuit of 25 miles we overtook 2 wagons, which were captured and burned. At this moment sharp firing was heard upon the left, and a messenger came from Colonel Stand Watie with the report that he was engaged with the enemy. I immediately moved in the direction,and upon our arrival I ascertained that Colonel Watie had overtaken a number of the enemy and had gallantly charged them. Major Boudinot, commanding the left flank of the regiment, had rushed into a deep ravine and driven the enemy from it. In the skirmish 15 men of the enemy were killed and a number of women and children taken.

Throughout our rapid march - sometimes an ground covered with snow and at others facing the chilly blasts from the north - the greatest enthusiasm prevailed in anticipation of the coming struggle, and at all times during the march and on the battle field every officer and soldier of the brigade nobly did his duty, and it is with heartfelt pride that I bright them to the notice of the Department. The charge at the commencement of the battle was splendid;none more gallant was ever made. Individual acts of daring and hand-to-hand encounters were of frequent occurrence during the day, it would be impossible to enumerate them. I therefore refer the Department to the troops of regimental and detachment commanders, herewith transmitted.

To Captain Elstner, of the Second Regiment Arkansas Mounted Riflemen,who acted as brigade quartermaster and commissary, my thanks are due for the efficient and able manner in which he conducted the affairs of his department. To my personal staff I am indebted for much valuable service. Both Mr. Frank C. Armstrong and Mr. James S.

Vann, by volunteer aides-de-camp, went gallantly into the fight, and bore themselves with great coolness and courage. Lieutenant G. A. Thornton, the acting assistant adjutant-general, was also active and efficient in carrying various orders, and deserves great credit for his coolness during the battle.
Casualties.-Killed, 9; wounded, 40.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Colonel, Commanding Division.

No. 11. Report of Colonel W. C. Young, Eleventh Texas Cavalry, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

SIR: I have the honor to report the action of my regiment in the engagement of the 26th December. I took up my position on the left, according to your instructions, at the commencement of the action. I remained there until the woods were on fire, and being satisfied that the enemy did not intend an attack on our left, I moved my regiment in the direction of the mountains, on the right. On moving up the first mountain I passed Major Chilton, of Colonel Greer's regiment, who was wounded in the head, and learning from him the direction the enemy had taken, I moved my regiment in an oblique direction through the mountains, where after going some 2 miles, we came up with the enemy, strongly posted among the rocks and timber. We immediately charged them, carrying everything before us. After this the enemy, being copletely routed, ran in different directions. My regiment then pursued them in detachment of companies, keeping up a running fight until 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The regiment was then rallied, and we proceeded to gather up the killed and wounded, which we succeeded in doing, and reached camp a little after dark.

My regiment killed 211, viz: BY the staff,3; a detachment of 36 men from companies of Captains Twitty, Reeves, and Young, commanded by Captain J. D. Young, killed 34; Captain Harman's company killed 16; Captain Burk's company killed 30; Captain Nicholson's company killed 16; Captain Bound's company killed 26; Captain Featherston's company killed 10; Captain Hill's company killed 26; Captain Wallace's company, 50. Total killed, 211.

Our loss killed on the field was 1 private, William Franklin, Captain Harman's company; mortally wounded, Sergt. W. H. H. Addington, of Captain Young's detachment, and W. S. Proctor, of Captain Wallis' company; and J. N. Robinson, of Captain Wallis' company, severely wounded, left arm broken; slightly wounded, Captain J. D. Young, in the thigh, and Benjamin Clark, private in Captain Featherston's company, wounded in the leg. Total killed and wounded, 6. In Captain Nicholson's company 3 horses shot, and in Captain Harman's company 3 horses shot. Captain Featherston's company lost -; Captain Hill's,1 killed. In Captain Wallis' company 1 horse killed and 1 disabled. In Captain Burk's company 1 horse lost.

We took a great many women, children, and negroes prisoners; also a number of horses and cattle, which were turned over, by your order, to Captain Gipson, of the Arkansas regiment.

In conclusion, I am proud to say that both officers and men of my regiment behaved throughout the engagement as became soldiers and Texans.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,
Colonel, Commanding Texas Cavalry.

No. 12. Report of Lieutenant Colonel John S. Griffith, Sixth Regiment Texas Cavalry, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH TEXAS REGIMENT, Camp Homing Creek, Cherokee Nation, December 27, 1861.

COLONEL: On the 26th instant, at 12 m., I was ordered by you to move my command up on the right of and parallel with Colonel Lane's command. This executed brought me to Hominy Creek, when I was further ordered to dismounted my men and form a line. When Colonel Lane made his gallant charge on the enemy I ordered my men to their horses, formed, and rapidly advanced in a flanking movement you intended for me to make up the valley for half a mile, crossed over to the west, or battle side of the creek, proceeded a short distance up, and discovered the enemy upon the opposite bank. I charged across the creek, put the enemy to rout, continued up the valley something like a half mile farther, cutting off all the straggling and then flying Indians in that direction. I then turned to the left in a northwestward direction over the rocky hills and gorges that made into the large gorge that was then in between Colonel Lane's command and mine. Continuing this course, I crossed over five or six rocky hills, on three of which, behind the rocks, the enemy were in position in considerable numbers. My men gallantly charged in succession, putting them completely to rout. It was during these charges that the brave and gallant Lieutenant Fitzhue and Thomas Arnold fell among the foremost in the fight.

After going about 3 miles in this direction I came to the Cross Hollows. There the enemy were collected in large numbers. Dismounting my men, we poured a galling fire on them at about 125 yards distance, which finally dislodged them. From thence I proceeded in a westward direction, cutting off occasionally straggling Indians, until 3.30 o'clock p.m. The loss of the enemy by my command, as near as can be estimated by myself and officers, is 70 killed; that of my own men, 15 killed and wounded, as follows, to wit:

Company C, Lieutenant Smith commanding, E. V. Howell, mortally wounded in the head: John R. West, wounded in the wrist. Company D, Lieutenant Kelly commanding, Bugler J. B. Harris, killed; G. W. Coffman, wounded in breast. Company E, Captain Wharton commanding, William Spencer, wounded in breast; W. P. Wright, wounded in breast and arm. Company F, Sergeant Young commanding, James Green, mortally wounded, shoulder and wrist; Henry Ellis, wounded in leg; George W. Wilson, wounded in chest and arm; Leonard Sheffield, wounded in breast. Company G, Captain Ross commanding, Thomas T. Arnold, killed; J. H. Whittington, wounded in groin. Company H, Lieutenant Whittington commanding, First Sergt. R. H. Baker, wounded slightly in shoulder; A. M. Keller, wounded slightly in hand. Company K, Captain Throckmorton commanding, First Lieutenant G. S. Fitzhue, killed.

At 3.30 o'clock I started back to where the battle commenced, where I arrived at dark, bringing in 75 women and children as prisoners and 3 negroes and 80 horses, which are herewith turned over to you. To the brave and gallant Captains Ross, Hardin, Wharton, and Throckmorton, and Lieutenants Scott, Cummings, Kelley, Smith, and Whittington, and Sergeant Young I am much indebted for the success we had by their fearless charges in the front of their respective commands, which so signally routed the enemy from every point. I ma indebted to Adjutant Gurley and Sergeant-Major Porter for their efficiency in transmitting orders, as well as for good fighting. Lieutenant Truitt, Vance, and Cannon, and every non-commissioned officer and private, for so nobly sustaining their officers, not only deserve my thanks, but the applause of their countrymen. Assistant Surgeon Bradford did good duty as a soldier in the ranks until his presence was required with the wounded, whom he has since constantly and skillfully attended.

Before closing I must return my sincere thanks to Captains Ross, Wharton, and Throckmorton, and Adjutant Gurley for timely assistance when I was in imminent personal peril, and my gratitude to Providence for crowning our arms with victory.
With respect, I am, your obedient servant,

Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Sixth Regiment Texas Cavalry.

No. 13. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Walter P. Lane, Third Texas (South Kansas-Texas) Cavalry, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

REGIMENTAL ENCAMPMENT, South Kansas-Texas Cavalry, December 26, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of my command in the battle of the 26th instant: I had with me the greater portion of five companies, to wit, Companies A, B, E, F, and G. To these were attached a few from other companies in the regiment, in all about 350 men. Company A was commanded by Sergt. R. B. Gause, Company B by Lieutenant M. D. Ector, Company E by Captain D. M. Short, Company F by Captain Isham Chisum, and Company G by Lieutenant O. A. Durrum. Our advance guard, in command of Captain Short, being fired upon by the enemy, stood firm until our force came up. It was at once, evident that thee enemy were in force and had taken a very strong position, protected and sheltered to a great extent by trees and rocks, with an open prairie in front of them.

I was ordered to charge the strongest point of the enemy. When the regiments had taken the different positions assigned them the bugle sounded the charge. As we approached the foot of the hill the enemy opened a heavy fire upon us. No confusion was created by it in our advancing columns. Many of the enemy made for their stronghold on the top of the hill, where there was a natural breastwork of rocks, and fired over the rocks at us. Many of my men, without making any halt, gained the heights by the few entrances on the side where it was alone accessible, while others dismounted and scaled the rock, and here for a short time a desperate struggle ensued.
Many shots were fired when the contending parties were only in a few steps of each other, and in some instances they were engaged in a hand-to-hand struggle. Soon the point was cleared by us and the enemy retreated in great confusion, some of them making a stand for a short time in the deep gorges and rocky defiles of the mountains. When we had completely scattered and routed those who had made a stand against us, hearing a heavy firing northeast, I obliqued with my command in that direction, and joined Stone's regiment, with which I co-operated during the remainder of the battle, going where from the firing we would be most likely to come up with the largest bodies of the enemy. We continued in the pursuit until one hour by sun in the evening.

It is due to all those in command of companies to say that they deserve great credit for the manner they led their companies into the charge and for their conduct throughout the battle. The truth is, every officer and private in my command acted gallantly and to my entire satisfaction during the engagement. I am proud indeed that at such a time it was my fortune to command such men. When I consider the position occupied by the enemy, I deem in nothing but due to you to state that the battle was admirably planned, and was executed by the different commands in a manner calculated to reflect great credit on our arms.

Yours, very respectfully,
Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding South Kansas-Texas Cavalry.

No. 14. Report of Captain William Gipson, Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles, of engagement of Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

DECEMBER 28, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken in the battle of Chustenahlah by the battalion of your regiment under my command, composed of the following companies: My own, commanded by Lieutenant Scott; Captain Parker's, command by Lieutenant Caldwell; Captain King's, command in person; and Captain Flannagan's, command by Lieutenant Callaway. In consequence of the companies being reduced by sickness and leave of absence, the whole number my command amounted to only 130 men.

On the morning of the 26th December, after marching 10 miles, we came in sight of the encampment of the enemy, between whom and our advance guard an animated fire soon ensued. In obedience to your order I took position in the center, Colonels Greer and Stone's regiment on my right and Colonel Young's regiment and Captain Bennett's company on my left. At the command we charged the enemy, who were positioned at a distance of 200 yards in the timber, and firing upon us from the points of the hills and valleys between. After our first fire they fell back among cliffs of rocks. We then dismounted, again attacked them, and again routed them. Finding that we could not overtake them on foot, we returned to our horses and followed up the retreat for 2 miles. Coming in sight of them, we again charged and routed them. We followed up the retreat for 3 miles, shooting and cutting the enemy down all along the route. i estimate that we killed from 80 to 100. I had none killed.
The following is a list of the wounded, viz:

My own company: Private J. G. Humphrey, dangerously; Private W. C. Eppler, dangerously; Private M. G. Blaylock, wounded in the arm; Private Riley Nicholson, slightly.

Captain Parker's company: William McCarthey, wounded in the head. Robert D. Bolton, wounded slightly.

Officers and men under my command fought bravely and did their whole duty.


Senior Captain, Commanding Bat. Second Ark. Mounted Riflemen.

Colonel McINTOSH, Commanding.

The men of battle.

Captain William Gipson, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, age 37, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Present in command of the first Bn. December 31, 1861. Not reelected May 8, 1862.

W. C. Eppler or Epler, private, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, age 26, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Badly wounded in battle at Chustenolah, C. N., December 26, 1861. Absent sick through June 30, 1862.

James. G. Humphrey, private, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, age 19, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Badly wounded in battle at Chustenolah, C. N., December 26, 1861. Captured December 21, 1861 near Nashville, TN. and sent to to Camp Chase, OH.

M. G. BLAYLOCK, private, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, age 19, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Wounded in battle at Chustenahlah (Indian Territory) December 26, 1861. Discharged for disability about April 20, 1862.

Riley W. Nicholson, private, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, age 26, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. In hospital at Greensboro, NC 5 Mar 1865.

Caption James M. Park or Parker, company G., Enlisted October 9, 1861, age 20. at Camp Holloway, MO. Promoted to Corporal May 12, 1862. Wounded and absent December 31, 1862. Shot through the hand. Severely wounded at Chickamauga, GA., and furloughed to AL., for 30 days. Disabled by G.S.W. September 19, 1863 and retired by medical board for 6 months.

Robert D. Bolton, private, company C., Enlisted November 26, 1861, age 18, at Camp Stephens. Wounded in battle at Chustenahlah (Indian Territory) December 26, 1861. Wounded at Murfreesboro, TN. Appointed First Sergeant March 27, 1863.

First Lieutenant, John T. Scott, company A., Enlisted July 18, 1861, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Commanding the company 31 Dec 1861. Not reelected 8 May 1862.

Second Lieutenant, William J. Caldwell, company B., Enlisted July 15, 1861, age 28, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Present, commanding Co B., December 31, 1861. Relieved by reorganization May 8, 1862.

Captain, James M. King, company C., Enlisted July 20, 1861, age 43, at a camp near Bentonville, AR. Elected 20 Jul 1861. Dangerously wounded 10 Aug 1861 at Oak Hills, MO. Reorganization 8 May 1862.

First Lieutenant, J. W. Callaway, company E., Enlisted July 27, 1861, age 27, at Camp McRae, AR. Ordered to duty as ACS., March 22, 1862 until about 1 Nov 1862. Was in the Trans-Miss Dept in Apr 1863.

Captain, William G. Flanigan or Flannagan, company G., Enlisted July 27, 1861, age 29, Osage Prairie, AR. Discharged., September 28, 1861 at Camp Cooper, MO on a surgeon's certificate of disability.

No. 15. Report of Captain H. S. Bennett, Lamar Cavalry Company, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

I beg leave to state that on the day of the battle I had in my command 40 men, and that we formed in line for battle about 12 noon, and in a very short time made a charge on the enemy, then stationed about 300 yards distant, who instantly upon the charge being made fell back upon the opposite side of a ravine, covered with bush and vine, and on our approach to that point we received orders to dismount; but finding the enemy at such a distance, retreating and firing, I immediately ordered my company to remount and charge; but before reaching the base of the mountain the enemy had ascended its top and made a stand, and as we charged to the top a steep and rocky mountain we encountered a very heavy fire from the enemy, about 100 strong.

We ascended the mountain in good order, and made a desperate charge and at once put the enemy to flight. The enemy retreated in disorder. Occasionally from ambush or the cover of trees and rocks we received their deadly shots, and in this manner the conflict continued until we had completely routed them from the mountain, and then the first struggle ended, the company killing some 20 of the enemy and wounding some 9 or 10. The number killed in my company was 2 - Privates F. Lane and H. E. Wilson. One slightly wounded.

A portion of my command, under Lieutenant I. H. Wright - whose gallantry on the occasion deserves praise - continued the pursuit some 7 or 8 miles, killing and wounding several more. It gives me pleasure to states that my small command did battle with a courage and heroism scarcely equaled. The engagement on the 26th continued some three or four hours. For such a signal and glorious victory the highest praise is due our gallant commander.

All of which is respectfully submitted.
Captain, Lamar Cavalry.
Colonel McINTOSH, Commanding Forces.

No. 16. Report of Colonel James McIntosh, Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles, commanding division, of skirmish with Creeks and Seminoles.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, Fort Smith, Ark., January 10, 1862.

GENERAL: In my report to you in regard to the captured property taken at Chustenahlah I should have stated that 190 sheep were turned over to the commissary, Captain Lanigan, at Fort Gibson.

Since writing that communication I have received a report from Colonel Watie, commanding Cherokee regiment (who I left behind to collect the stock taken from the Indians), stating he brought back with him between 800 and 800 head of cattle and 250 Indian ponies. Colonel Cooper, who marched with his command of Indians over the ground two or three days after the battle, also found a number of cattle, which were secured. All this property is in addition to what I have hitherto reported.

Colonel Watie also reports that on his return to Grand River from the battle-field, he having ascertained that a company of Cherokees numbering 50 or 60 were near his camp,making their way northward, with arms in their hands, sent two companies to arrest them. In endeavoring to accomplish this 1 Cherokee was killed and 7 made prisoners. Their wagons and some of their arms fell into the hands of Colonel Watie. From an officer just in from Colonel Cooper's command I ascertain that Hopoeithleyohola has gone to Kansas, and has not more than 400 or 500 Creeks with him. Many of the Indians who espoused his cause have left him the battle, and are now anxious to come in and make a treaty. As we have made them entirely destitute, I think all but Hopoeithleyohola's immediate followers will come in.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,
Colonel, Commanding.

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