Thursday, September 04, 2008

Chaplains Of The Army & Navy-1776-1875.

I have yet done a page on the Chaplains of the army or navy, I guess I just never thought about it, although they were a very important part of the Army and navy service and is still is today. You well note that there is more information for some and little for others, this does mean there’s no information for them, it’s just that I had to made room so I could give you all the names I found. Those of you who find a ancestors name here and it has little information on it, can write to me and I will see what kind of information I can find.

I can be reached at the following: dsegelquist1@cox.net

Note. This information comes from the many Departments of the Library of Congress.


Army.

Chaplains of the Army 1813.

1. David Jones, Pennsylvania, April 2, 1813, District No. 9, New York north of the highlands and Vermont. In 1776, it was order that he was to be given his pay as chaplain to the 3rd. And 4th., Pennsylvania battalions, from the 13th of June to the 29 of August, inclusive, 84 40/90 dollars. In May of 1778 he was recommended to be chaplain to the Brigade under the command of Francis Johnston. In 1797, there was a memorial of David Jones, chaplain to the legion of the United States under the command of the late Major General Wayne, which was presented to the House and read, praying that he may receive his pay and other emoluments in that capacity, from the time he was deranged by an act of the last session of Congress, until the fourth day of March next. In December he had a petition into the Army of the United States, it was presented to the House and read, praying the consent of Congress to work a salt spring, situated on the East side of the Sciota river, in the territory of the United States, Northwest of the Ohio. In 1800 he had a petition into the Army of the United States, for the late war, praying that he may be allowed donation lands in common with other military characters to whom he have been allowed. In 1813 he was appointed to District No. 8, in April 2, 1813, but the register states no. 9.

2. Peter J. Van Pelt, April 2, 1813, District No. 3., New York from the sea to the highlands and east of New Jersey.

3. James I. Wilmer, May 20, 1813, District No. 8., Kentucky, Ohio, Territories of Indiana, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri.

4. Robert Elliot, May 20, 1813, District No. 9., New York north of the highlands and Vermont.

5. Aaron J. Booge, June 16, 1813, District No. 9., New York north of the highlands and Vermont. In 1816, was nominated for the staff of the Northern Division of the army. In the year of 1819, he had a petition in congress praying that a system of moral instruction may be adopted for the army, and that he may be employed as a teacher or chaplain. In 1820 his petition was not granted.

6. Stephen Lindsley, July 29, 1813, District No. 8., Kentucky, Ohio, Territories of Indiana, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri.

7. Thomas Hersey, August 20, 1813, District No. 8., Kentucky, Ohio, Territories of Indiana, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri. Appointed to the Rifle regiment.

8. Adam Empie, Chaplain of the Military Academy in 1813.

Chaplains of the Army 1816.

1. Robert Elliott or Elliot, See register of 1813.

2. Adam Epie, Chaplain and Professor of Ethics, see register of 1813.

3. Carter Tarrant, Kentucky, appointed to the 40th., infantry.

Note. It seems that the Army did not print a register for the army chaplains after 1816, for some reason? Because of this I’ll have to do it the hard way and because of this the years will jump around, as I will put them down as I find them. I later found out the army did not enlist chaplains after 1816, however there were chaplains but they were only volunteers, but by the time the Civil War came around there was a Chaplain General appointed and he would appoint other chaplains to districts and regiments of the army.

In 1871, there was a relief Bill in congress for Rev. Benjamin F. Perky who, on the nineteenth day of September, eighteen hundred and sixty-three, duly commissioned by the governor of the State of Indiana chaplain of the One hundred and eighteenth Indiana Volunteers, and as such chaplain discharged his duties until, by reason of ill health, brought on by exposure in the line of duty, on the twenty-first of December, eighteen hundred and sixty-three, became partially deranged and was placed in the Hospital for the Insane for treatment; and whereas, owing to the continuous march of said troops, he was deprived of being mustered into the service of the United States as such chaplain, his commission never having reached him, and that for such services he has never received any compensation whatever from the Government of the United States.

Note. This Bill pass and he was paid.

Samuel Hibben.
1868.

Granting a pension to Elizabeth O. Hibben, widow of Reverend Samuel Hibben, deceased, late a chaplain in the fourth cavalry regiment, Illinois volunteers.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United State of Ameri1can congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to place on the pension roll, subject to the provisions and limitations of the pension laws, the name of Elizabeth O. Hibben, widow of Reverend Samuel Hibben, late a chaplain of the fourth cavalry regiment, Illinois volunteers, who had been appointed to that position with the rank of captain, and died of disease contracted in the service, leaving surviving said widow, and issue, one child, a son, of the name of John Grier Hibben, born April nineteenth, eighteen hundred and sixty—one; and that she be paid during her widowhood a pension of twenty dollars per month, to commence o the tenth day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-two: and at her marriage or death the pension from that event to be paid to said child, if then under sixteen years old. Passed the house of Representatives July 9, 1868.

Francis H. Cumming.
1872.

A BILL
For the re1ief of Mrs. Charlotte Cumming, widow of the late Francis H. Cumming, chaplain of the Third ‘Michigan Infantry.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to Mrs. Charlotte Cumming, widow of the late Francis H. Cumming, chaplain of the Third
Michigan Infantry, the sum of one thousand seven hundred and fifty-seven dollars, that being the amount which would have been her due as pension-money from August twenty-
sixth, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, to December twenty11 second, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine: Provided, That she had proved her pension-claim as required by Law.

William H. Rogers
1860.

A BILL
Granting a pension to Reverend William H. Rogers, chaplain in
the United States army in the war with Mexico.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to place the name of William H. Rogers on the invalid pension rolls of the United States, at the rate of six dollars per month, to commence on the first day of January, eighteen hundred and sixty, and continue during his natural life.

Simeon W. Harkey.
1865.

Rev'd Simeon W. Harkey, of Illinois, for appointment as hospital chaplain at Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois, in the service of the United States.

Jacob A. Rosenberg.
1865.

Rev'd Jacob A. Rosenberg, of New York, for appointment as hospital chaplain at general hospital, Troy, N. Y, in the service of the United States.

1778.

The Rev. John Gano be appointed chaplain of the brigade commanded by Brigadier James Clinton.

The Rev. Adam Boyd be appointed chaplain to the North Carolina brigade, commanded by Colonel Clarke.

The Rev. John Hurt be appointed chaplain to the brigade late commanded by Brigadier Weedon.

Samuel Blair.
1779.

The Rev. Mr. Samuel Blair be appointed chaplain of the brigade of artillery; and that this appointment have effect as if made on the first day of March, 1779, from which time he has officiated as chaplain to the brigade.

William Van Horne .
1779.

Mr. William Van Horne be appointed chaplain to the brigade now, or lately under the command of Brigadier General Glover, and that he be considered and respected as such.

J. Montgomery.
1778.

The Rev. Mr. J. Montgomery be allowed the pay of a brigade chaplain for the time of his service in that capacity, agreeably to Brigadier Smallwood's certificate, viz. from June last.

1871.
Chaplain James J. Kane to be advanced in his grade next after Chaplain George W. Dorrance, and to date from the 8th of August, 1861.

Thomas H. Monroe.
1862.

The following-named person for appointment as hospital chaplain, under the act approved May 20th, 1862: Thomas H. Monroe, of West Virginia.

Rev. John Hurt.
1778.

The Rev. John Hurt, and a recommendation in his favour by Brigadier Scott, to be appointed chaplain to his brigade, with a certificate that he has acted as such since 25 July last, the said Mr. J. Hurt, was chaplain to the brigade late commanded by Brigadier Weedon, be re-considered, and that the said Mr. J. Hurt be appointed chaplain to the brigade commanded by Brigadier Scott.

Rev. Mr. Henry Miller.
1778.

Rev. Mr. Henry Miller be appointed a chaplain to the Germans in the main army; and that he be allowed the pay and privileges of a brigade chaplain, without being confined to any particular brigade.

John Mason.
1778.

That a chaplain be appointed to the garrisons in the posts on Hudson's river, in the Highlands, and that he be entitled to the same pay and subsistence as a brigade Chaplain the Rev. Mr. John Mason was appointed chaplain to the garrisons in the said posts.

Note. In 1778, The chaplains were being paid fifty dollars per month.

The following-named persons have appointments as hospital chaplains, under the act approved May 20, 1862.

A. H. Lackey, of Illinois.
James Fitzgibbon, of Illinois.
John C. Gregg, of Pennsylvania.
Paul Wald, of Pennsylvania.

Isaac Mansfield.
1790.

The petition of Isaac Mansfield, praying compensation for his services as a chaplain in the late Army of the United States.


Greenbury W. Ridgely, of Kentucky, to be Chaplain in the Navy, 1828.


Charles P. McIlvaine, of New Jersey, to be Chaplain and Professor of Geography, History, and Ethics, at the Military Academy at West Point, 1825.

S. Kirkland.
1779.

Mr. S. Kirkland be appointed chaplain to the garrison of Fort Schuyler, and the other posts established in that quarter, with the pay and subsistence of a brigade chaplain, continuing at the same time to pay as great attention to the Oneidas, and other Indians contiguous to them, as may be consistent with the above-mentioned appointment.

William Rogers.
1781.

Mr. Rogers was appointed a Brigade Chaplain to the third Pennsylvania brigade, which does not now exist, as the line of the State is formed into two brigades only. But by the resolve of the 8th. ulto., he cannot be considered as out of the army unless he is certified to be a retiring chaplain by the Commander of the Southern Army. He has eleven months pay due to him and before any warrant can be granted it will be necessary for Congress to direct Ordered, That the Board of War draw a Warrant on the paymaster general for three months' pay, in favor of the revd Mr. William Rogers, as brigade chaplain.

Horace M. Carr, of Tennessee, appointment as hospital chaplain under the act approved May 20, 1862.

Robert M'Murdie.
1776.

That there is due to the Rev. Robert M'Murdie, for his extra services in officiating as chaplain to Colonel Jacob Clotz's betaIlion, from 18th October, 1776, to 1st January 1777, is 2 months 13 days, at 20 dollars per month, the sum of 48 60/90 dollars:

Mons. Lotbinier.
1776.

That there is due to the Rev. Mons. Lotbinier, for one month's pay and rations as chaplain, from 10th July to 10th instant, 48 dollars, also, for the difference of pay which took place 11th April last, in the pay of chaplains, he having received only at the rate of 33 1/3d dollars per month, whereas the pay was 40 dollars per month, the difference 6 2/3 dollars per month, for three months, 20 dollars.

Aaron Jordon Booge, of New York, to be chaplain of the army.

Monsr. Lotbiniere.
1777.

That two months' pay and rations be paid to Monsr. Lotbiniere, as chaplain, from the 10th of January last. Drew an order on Mr. Hillegas for 82 60/90 dollars.

Seraphine Lamberton.
1783.

The petition of Seraphine Lamberton who served as Chaplain in Count Rochambeau's Army, praying the permission of Congress to exercise his functions at Detroit.

Robert Smith.
1786.

Robert Smith was appointed in the beginning of the year 1780 chaplain to the Southern hospital by General Lincoln; that he continued in the exercise of the duties of his appointment until May, 1780, the time of the surrender of Charleston to the British Army, at which time he was made a prisoner of war; that he continued in Charleston attending his duty at the hospital for a considerable time after its surrender and until he was ordered to Hadrell's point to remain among the officers of the federal army who were there confined; that he continued there until June, 1781, when he was sent to Philadelphia on parole, in which situation he remained, until the end of the war, in captivity and at a distance from his country and estate, for tho' repeated attempts were made to exchange him it was not in his power ever to obtain it, in consequence of which he was prevented from returning to South Carolina, and paying that attention to his affairs he might otherwise have done had he not been restrained by the terms of his parole.

The Committee also find That Congress on the 2d. day of June, 1785, directed That those officers of the hospital department who were detained in Charleston after its surrender for the purpose of attending the sick and wounded of the army of the United States shall in consideration of the extra expences they incurred by performance of said duty, be allowed the sums affixed to their respective names contained in a return deposited in the war office and signed "David Oliphant deputy director general of the Southern hospital."

It appears that the memorialist did remain in Charleston and from a certificate of the said David Oliphant that he performed the duty of a chaplain to the hospital until the middle of April, 1781 (eleven months and a half), and that his name was omitted by mistake on the payroll of hospital officers entitled to extra expences and sent to the secretary at war dated August 10, 1783, as above stated and that the allowance he is entitled to under the above resolution is at the rate of thirty dollars per month.

The Commissioner farther reports that notwithstanding the resolutions of the 9th. November, 1780, and January 17, 1781, the memorialist has been considered as entitled to pay, in consequence of his being a prisoner.

On this state of facts the Committee begs leave to remark That as the memorialist was a prisoner at the time of the new arrangement of the hospital and continued in consequence of his commission in the federal army in a disagreeable state of captivity during the war, they do not conceive that the said arrangement ought to be considered as extending to him, but are of opinion that he is clearly entitled to his commutation.

As it appears from the certificate of the deputy director general that he was in Charleston and of officiated at the hospital during the time above mentioned, but that his name was omitted by mistake in the list transmitted to the Secretary at War the Committee think there can be no doubt he is entitled to the sum allowed the hospital officers in consideration of their extra expences under the resolution of 2d. June, 1785, Whereupon they submit to Congress the following resolutions: Resolved, That the Commissioner for settling the accounts of the army be and he is hereby directed to issue to the Reverend Robert Smith a certificate for his commutation for half pay in the same manner it has been issued to the other officers of the federal army.

Note. 1776, That there be but one chaplain to every two regiments of the army at Cambridge, and that the pay of each chaplain be 33 1/3 dollars per month.

Mr. Noah Cook was elected chaplain of the hospitals in the eastern department.

Manuel J. Gonzales, late hospital chaplain, to be chaplain in the Ninth Regiment United States Cavalry, December 26, 1868, vice Jacobi retired.

The following nominations for appointment in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States of America, 1864.

W. W. Bennett, of Virginia, to be chaplain, to report to the Medical Director, Richmond, for assignment to hospital duty, to rank from December 23, 1864.

D. Manney, of Alabama, to be chaplain, for duty at St. Mary's Hospital, Montgomery, Ala., vice Chaplain Pellicer, resigned, to rank from December 22, 1864.

………………………………...

James J. Kane, for having exhibited extraordinary heroism during the rebellion, to be advanced in his grade next after Chaplain George W. Donance, and to date from the 8th of August, 1861.

William L. McCalla, Chaplain to the Staff of the Southern Division of the Army.

Rev'd John W. French, of the District of Columbia, for the appointment of chaplain and professor of geography, history and ethics at the Military Academy at West Point, 1856.

Rev. Mr. Dwight be appointed a chaplain to Brigadier Parsons' brigade, 1777.

William Rogers.
1778.

Colonel Spencer, commanding the brigade late Brigadier Conway's, having recommended the Rev. William Rogers to be chaplain to that brigade, Congress proceeded to an election, and, the ballots being taken, the Rev. Mr. William Rogers was elected chaplain to the brigade late commanded by Brigadier Conway.

Mons. de Lotbinier, chaplain in the service of the United States, 48 dollars on account of his pay and rations, and for which he is to be accountable, 1777.

Samuel Carrick, of Tennessee, to be a Chaplain, 1809.

Samuel Kirkland.

Resolved, That the Revd. Samuel Kirkland, be and he is hereby appointed Chaplain to the troops of the U. States to be stationed at the western Posts, and that he continue his services among the Indians of the six nations and endeavour to preserve their attachment to the interests of the U. States, and that for these services he receive the allowance of --.

Cave Jones, late a Chaplain in the Army, to be Chaplain and Professor, Military Academy, 1818.

William Krebs, of Missouri, hospital chaplain, under the act approved May 20, 1862.

Rev. Byron Sunderland, resigning his office of chaplain to the Senate.

Mr. Lotbinier for his pay and subsistance, as chaplain to Colonel Livingston's regiment, from the 10 July, to the 10 August instant, sixty dollars.

John Thurston, of South Carolina, praying to be allowed his pay and rations as a Chaplain in a detachment of militia lately employed in the service of the United States.

Mons. Lotbinier, a Canadian chaplain, for his pay and rations, from 10 June to 10 July, being one month, the sum of 41 30/90 dollars:

William H. Corkhill, of Iowa, hospital chaplain, under the act approved May 20, 1862:

William Plumb.
1777.

William Plumb receive the pay and emoluments of a brigade-chaplain, from the 20 day of September, 1777, when he was appointed chaplain to the northern hospital by General Gates, until the 30 September 1780 when all hospital chaplains were deranged during the time he continued in service: That it be recommended to the State of Connecticut, of which Mr. Plumb is an inhabitant, to settle with him for his pay and depreciation, during the time mentioned in the foregoing resolution he was on duty, on the principles adopted by them in their settlements with the officers of the line of that State.

John Nevelling.
1776.

A certificate from Brigadier Generals H. Mercer and P. Dickinson, in favour of the Rev. John Nevelling, who has officiated as chaplain to nine Jersey battalions.

John Hurt.
1789.

A petition of John Hurt, late a chaplain in the Continental Army, was presented to the House and read, praying that his claims for services in several military stations may be liquidated and satisfied.

Charles M. Blake.
1866.

The petition of Charles M. Blake, late hospital chaplain United States army, praying to be allowed a year's pay and allowances as chaplain, claimed to be due him, deducting there from the amount received by him under the joint resolution of June 27, 1866.

Manuel J. Gonzales, late hospital chaplain, to be chaplain of the Ninth Regiment United States Cavalry December 26, 1868, vice Jacobi, retired.

Thomas W. Clark, of Massachusetts, for appointment as hospital chaplain in the service of the United States, under the act approved May 20, 1862.

David M'Clure was elected chaplain of the batallion commanded by Colonel M'Coy, 1776.

Joseph S. Hughes, praying compensation for services rendered, as Chaplain to the Northwestern Army, surrendered by General Hull, 1813.

Thomas Warner, to be Chaplain, and Professor of Ethics at the Military Academy, January 1st, 1828.

John Bantly, of Wisconsin, as hospital chaplain, under the act approved May 20th, 1862

David Griffith.
1776.

Dr. David Griffith be appointed to the stations of chaplain and surgeon in the third Virginia regiment, he being a person of uncommon merit, and there being very few surgeons of abilities who will enter into the army in that state; this appointment not to be drawn into precedent

David Jones, for his pay as chaplain to the 3d and 4th Pennsylvania battalions, from the 13th of June to the 29 of August, inclusive, 84 40/90 dollars, 1776.

Amos Thompson.
1796.

A petition of Amos Thompson, chaplain of the rifle battalion commanded by Colonel Hugh Stevenson, during the late war.

Isaac Mansfield.
1813.

A petition of Isaac Mansfield, of Massachusetts, praying to be paid the amount due him for undrawn rations, to which he was entitled as a Chaplain in the Revolutionary Army.

Fortieth Regiment of Infantry.

Stephen Lindley, Chaplain, 16th. Regiment Ohio, 1813.

Appointment in the Army of the United States to be post chaplains, to rank from July 2, 1870:

Thomas B. Van Horne, late post chaplain, United States Army, to fill the vacancy caused by his own resignation.

Moses J. Kelley, late chaplain of the Sixth Regiment Maine Volunteers, vice Kevitt, resigned.

Dudley Chase, of California, as hospital chaplain, under the act approved May 20th, 1862.

George C. M. Roberts.
1864.

George C. M. Roberts, to be pay for services as chaplain at Fort McHenry and for money expended by him in erecting a chapel.

John Nevelling.
1777.

John Nevelling officiated as chaplain to nine New Jersey battalions for one month and six days, at 50 dollars per month, amounting to 59 77/90 dollars; of which he received of the pay master 33 30/90 dollars, and that a balance of 26 47/90 should be paid him.


Navy.

Robert K. Diossy, was appointed chaplain of the navy in 1872.

Chaplains of the navy-1847.
Nominated:


Thomas Coke Stanley, of Alabama, to be chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Wm. Ryland.

Edward Eaton, of Ohio, to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of George W. Latham.

John L. Lenhart, of New Jersey, to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Charles H. Alden.

John Blake, of Maine, to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Nathan C. Fletcher.

William T. Sprole, of the District of Columbia, to be chaplain and professor of geography, history, and ethics at the Military Academy at West Point.

Jared L. Elliott, of the District of Columbia, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 13th of July, 1838.

Peter G. Clark, of Connecticut, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 3d of October, 1838.

1844.
The withdraw of the nomination of Luther Hamilton to be a chaplain in the Navy, made to the Senate on the 18 day of January, 1844, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Samuel T. Gillet.

1844.
The nomination Luther Hamilton to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of John P. Lathrop, who was appointed in the recess to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Thompson S. Harris.

1828.

Charles Samuel Stewart, of New York, to be a Chaplain in the Navy, from the first of November, 1828.

Joseph S. Christmas, of New York, to be a Chaplain in the Navy.

1844.

John Grigg to be a chaplain in the Navy from the 5th of September, 1844, at which time he was appointed to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Chaplain Wilmer.

Nathaniel Frost, to be a chaplain in the Navy from the 5th of October, 1844, at which time he was appointed to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Chaplain Swan.

Alexander M'Farlan, of Virginia, to be a Chaplain in the Navy, 1802.

Rev. Cheever Felch, Acting Chaplain, to be a Chaplain in the Navy of the United States, 1817.

George Jones to be a chaplain in the Navy from the 20th of April, 1833.

Thomas R. Lambert to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1833.

William Ryland, to be Chaplain in the Navy, from 23d May, 1829.

Timothy J. Harrison, to be Chaplain in the Navy, from 2d October, 1829.

Justin Spaulding.
1854.

Justin Spaulding, asking pay for services as chaplain on board the United States ship Independence.

George W. Dorrance of the District of Columbia, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 2 January, 1860, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Chaplain P. G. Clarke.

Addison Searle, of New Hampshire, to be a Chaplain in the Navy, 1820.

I. P. B. Wilmer, of Virginia, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 7th of March, 1839.

Rodman Lewis, of Indiana, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 13th of March, 1839.

Charles W. Thomas to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 29th of October, 1853, vice Chaplain Thomas Coke Stanley, resigned.

John Addison to be Chaplain in the Navy, 1825.

John Cook, of Kentucky, to be a Chaplain in the Navy, 1812.

The following persons for the offices respectively annexed to their names, 1845.

George W. Lathram to be a chaplain in the Navy, in place of John P. Lathrop, deceased.
Nathaniel Frost to be a chaplain in the Navy, in the place of Chapman Swan, deceased.
Nathaniel C. Fletcher to be a chaplain the Navy, to fill a vacancy, the appointment in the recess of John Grigg having ceased with the late session of the Senate.

Moses B. Chase, of Massachusetts, acting Chaplain in the Navy, 1822.

Burgess Allison, of New Jersey, to be Chaplains in the Navy, 1822.

L. H. Pierce, late chaplain United States navy, praying for arrears of salary.

Joel W. Newton to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Chaplain Samuel T. Gillet, 1844.

Dennis Powers for chaplain in the Navy, in place of the Reverend Orville Dewey, resigned, 1853.

John P. Fenner, to be Chaplain in the Navy, from 25th February, 1828.

John Robb to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 7th of October, 1843, at which time he was appointed to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of James Wiltbank.

Burgess Allison, of Pennsylvania, to be a Chaplain in the Navy, 1823.

John Robb to be a chaplain in the Navy from the 7th of October, 1843, at which time he was appointed to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of James Wiltbank.

Luther Hamilton to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Samuel T. Gillet, 1843.

Walter Cotton, to be a chaplain in the Navy, from the 6th November, 1830.

Edward McLaughlin, of New York, to be a Chaplain in the Navy of the United States.

Hervey H. Hays, of Connecticut, to be Chaplain in the Navy, from 3d May, 1827.

Thomas G. Salter, of New Hampshire, to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1861,vice Charles W. Thomas, resigned.

Note. Navy:1860, Chaplains shall be paid as lieutenants. After nine years from the date of commission, lieutenants shall receive, when on duty at sea, twenty-two hundred and fifty dollars, on other duty, two thousand dollars, and on leave, or waiting orders, fifteen hundred dollars. Every chaplain retained in the service shall be required to report annually to the Secretary of the Navy, the official services performed by him.

D. H. Trebon to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1871.

James Wiltbank, praying to be compensated for services rendered as chaplain at the Naval Asylum at Philadelphia, 1834.

Vernon Eskridge, of Virginia, to be a chaplain in the Navy, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Chaplain Addison Searle, 1851.

Henry H. Clark, of Maine, to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1873.

Robert Hudson to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1874.

George A. Crawford, to be a chaplain in the Navy, 1870.

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